Best Programming Language

Best Programming Language

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Programming, python, Readers' Choice Awards

Carlie Fairchild
Fri, 04/06/2018 – 14:23

Surprise—Python wins again!

Here’s the breakdown (the contenders listed below were
nominated by LJ readers via Twitter):

  • Python: 31%
  • C: 20%
  • C++: 14%
  • Other: 9%
  • Java: 8%
  • Perl: 7%
  • JavaScript: 4%
  • PHP: 3%
  • Ruby: 3%

Python
wins Best Programming Language again this year in Linux Journal‘s
annual Readers’ Choice Awards. It’s easy to use, powerful and
versatile with a really large and active community. Having that
supportive community ensures that developers of all skill levels
easily can find the support and documentation they require, which feeds
Python’s popularity. It certainly helps that Python has something like a
corporate sponsor. Python is recognized as an official language at
Google, running on many of its internal systems and showing up in
many Google APIs. In fact, Google’s developer website offers free Python
classes, videos and exercises
.

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Weekend Reading: Sysadmin 101

Weekend Reading: Sysadmin 101

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Kyle Rankin

Kyle Rankin
Fri, 04/06/2018 – 12:27

This series covers sysadmin basics. The first article explains how to approach alerting and on-call rotations as a sysadmin. In the second article, I discuss how to automate yourself out of a job, and in the third, I explain why and how you should use tickets. The fourth article covers some of the fundamentals of patch management under Linux, and the fifth and final article describes the overall sysadmin career path and the attributes that might make you a “senior sysadmin” instead of a “sysadmin” or “junior sysadmin”, along with some tips on how to level up.

Sysadmin 101: Alerting

In this first article, I cover on-call alerting. Like with any job title, the responsibilities given to sysadmins, DevOps and Site Reliability Engineers may differ, and in some cases, they may not involve any kind of 24×7 on-call duties, if you’re lucky. For everyone else, though, there are many ways to organize on-call alerting, and there also are many ways to shoot yourself in the foot.

Sysadmin 101: Automation

Here we cover systems administrator fundamentals. These days, DevOps has made even the job title “systems administrator” seem a bit archaic, much like the “systems analyst” title it replaced. These DevOps positions are rather different from sysadmin jobs in the past. They have a much larger emphasis on software development far beyond basic shell scripting, and as a result, they often are filled by people with software development backgrounds without much prior sysadmin experience. In the past, a sysadmin would enter the role at a junior level and be mentored by a senior sysadmin on the team, but in many cases currently, companies go quite a while with cloud outsourcing before their first DevOps hire. As a result, the DevOps engineer might be thrust into the role at a junior level with no mentor around apart from search engines and Stack Overflow posts.

Sysadmin 101: Ticketing

By ticketing, I’m referring to systems that allow sysadmins to keep track of tasks both internally and those requested by their coworkers or customers. There are many ways to get ticketing wrong so that it becomes a drain on an organization, so many sysadmins avoid or it use it begrudgingly. Also, ticketing approaches that work well for developers may be horrible for sysadmins, and vice versa. If you don’t currently use a ticketing system, I hope by the end of this article, I’ve changed your mind. If you do use tickets, but you wish you didn’t, I hope I can share how to structure a ticketing system that makes everything easier, not more difficult.

Sysadmin 101: Patch Management

Most Linux system administrators are no different from Windows sysadmins when it comes to patch management. Honestly, in some areas (in particular, uptime pride), some Linux sysadmins are even worse than Windows sysadmins regarding patch management. So in this article, I cover some of the fundamentals of patch management under Linux, including what a good patch management system looks like, the tools you will want to put in place and how the overall patching process should work.

Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up

In the past, a sysadmin would enter the role at a junior level and be mentored by a senior sysadmin on the team, but in many cases these days, companies go quite a while with cloud outsourcing before their first DevOps hire. As a result, the DevOps engineer might be thrust into the role at a junior level with no mentor around apart from search engines and Stack Overflow posts.

 

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Ubuntu 18.04 Gives Nautilus a Striking New Look

Ambiance GTK theme in Ubuntu 18.04 LTSThere’s a rather large visual change in Ubuntu 18.04 that I’ve only just noticed. It’s not because the change in question is subtle or easy to miss. It’s because I have only just booted up a copy of the Bionic Beaver thanks to the release of Ubuntu 18.04 beta 2. And wow; the change dramatically alters the appearance […]

This post, Ubuntu 18.04 Gives Nautilus a Striking New Look, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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Matthew Garrett Calls on Symantec to Share Its Code, EFF Questions Google's Work on Project Maven and More

News briefs for April 6, 2018.

Linux kernel developer, free software activist and Google engineer Matthew Garrett discovered that Symantec is using a Linux distro based on the QCA Software Development Kit (QSDK) project: “This is a GPLv2-licensed, open-source platform built around the Linux-based OpenWrt Wi-Fi router operating system” (if true, this means Symantic needs to share the Norton Core Router’s code). So, Garrett tweeted “Hi @NortonOnline the Norton Core is clearly running Linux and the license requires you to distribute the kernel source code so where can I get it?” (Source: ZDNet.)

The EFF has questions and advice for Google regarding the company’s work on “Project Maven”, which is “a U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) initiative to deploy machine learning for military purposes”. Read the “Google Should Not Help the U.S. Military Build Unaccountable AI Systems” post by Peter Eckersley and Cindy Cohn for more information.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) final beta was released this morning. This release includes Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Desktop, Server and Cloudproducts, as well as Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu. Note that this version is still beta and not intended for use in production. The final release is scheduled for April 26. See the release notes for more details and download images.

Zilliqa recently announced its Testnet v1.0 release: codename Red Prawn. According to the press release, Zilliqa’s is the “first blockchain platform to actually implement the technology of sharding, which has the potential to scale blockchain transaction speeds to match VISA.”

openSUSE’s Tumbleweed distro (a pure rolling-release version of openSUSE) had several snapshot releases this week, most notably with updates to KDE’s newest point version of Plasma (5.12.4). The snapshots this week also included updates to gstreamer, Firefox and Digikam, among other things.

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RHSA-2018:0649-1: Important: libvorbis security update

Red Hat Enterprise Linux: An update for libvorbis is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.

Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of
Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives
a detailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability from the CVE
link(s) in the References section.
CVE-2018-5146

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RHSA-2018:0648-1: Important: thunderbird security update

Red Hat Enterprise Linux: An update for thunderbird is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of
Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives
a detailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability from the CVE
link(s) in the References section.
CVE-2018-5125, CVE-2018-5127, CVE-2018-5129, CVE-2018-5144, CVE-2018-5145, CVE-2018-5146

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RHSA-2018:0647-1: Important: thunderbird security update

Red Hat Enterprise Linux: An update for thunderbird is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.

Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of
Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives
a detailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability from the CVE
link(s) in the References section.
CVE-2018-5125, CVE-2018-5127, CVE-2018-5129, CVE-2018-5144, CVE-2018-5145, CVE-2018-5146

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