Weekend Reading: Backups

backup!

Public Service Announcement: please do a backup if you haven’t in awhile. This weekend we feature articles varying from scary backup stories to how-to safeguard your data with encrypted backup solutions. 

 

Scary Backup Stories

by Paul Barry

Backups. We all know the importance of making a backup of our most important systems. Unfortunately, some of us also know that realizing the importance of performing backups often is a lesson learned the hard way. Everyone has their scary backup stories. Here are mine.

 

Reliable, Inexpensive RAID Backup

by Brian C. Lane

As a topic, backups is one of those subject likely to elicit as many answers as people you ask about it. It is as personal a choice as your desktop configuration or your operating system. So in this article I am not even going to attempt to cover all the options. Instead I describe the methods I use for building a reliable, useful backup system. This solution is not the right answer for everyone, but it works well for my situation.

 

Encrypted Backup Solution “Home Paranoia Edition”

by Tim Cordova

How to safeguard your personal data with TrueCrypt and SpiderOak.

There are so many cases of personal identifiable information (PII) or any type of data exposed on the Internet today. The details provided in this article may assist in safeguarding your tax information, social security number or password file. The setup this article describes will help keep your personal data at home safe and secure in this “cyber-security”-connected world. This includes virtual/physical security compromises—the only truly secure system is one that is unplugged and locked in a vault. This solution is not all-encompassing and does have limitations, but it is sound enough for safeguarding personal data.

 

LVM and Removable IDE Drives Backup System

by Mike Fogarty

When the company I work for, a civil engineering and surveying firm, decided to move all its AutoCad drawings onto a central fileserver, we were presented with a backup situation orders of magnitude larger than anything we had confronted before. We had at that time (now considerably larger) about 120,000 files, totaling 200GB, that were in active change and needed to be backed up at least daily.

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