Category Archives: Linux.com

Linux.com

Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Stefano Stabellini

The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project, and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.

Read More

Capital One: Open Source in a Regulated Environment

Most people know Capital One as one of the largest credit card companies in the U.S. Some also know that we’re one of the nation’s largest banks — number 8 in the U.S. by assets. But Capital One is also a technology-focused digital bank that is proud to be disrupting the financial services industrythrough our commitment to cutting edge technologies and innovative digital products. Like all U.S.

Read More

Tips for Troubleshooting DNS

Need relief for your DNS headaches? First, it helps to understand how the domain name system works under the hood.

DNS is the Internet’s phonebook. Whenever you type in or click a human-readable web link (such as hpe.com), your web browser calls on a domain name system (DNS) resolver to resolve its corresponding Internet Protocol (IP) address.

DNS is essential. Without it, there is no Internet. Period. End of statement.

Read More

Linus Torvalds Says Linux Kernel v5.0 'Should Be Meaningless'

Following the release of Linux kernel 4.16, Linus Torvalds has said that the next kernel will be version 5.0. Or maybe it won’t, because version numbers are meaningless.

The announcement — of sorts — came in Torvalds’ message over the weekend about the first release candidate for version 4.17. He warns that it is not “shaping up to be a particularly big release” and questions whether it even matters what version number is slapped on the final release.

Read More

5 Raspberry Pi Operating Systems That Aren’t Linux

Looking for a way to get the most out of your Raspberry Pi? Running a project that just needs something more? Odd as it may seem, Linux might be the problem, so why not consider a non-Linux operating system? Several have been released, or adapted, for use on the Raspberry Pi.

1. Plan 9

Released as an open-source operating system in 1992, Plan 9 has a small footprint and is targeted at developers. Its lightweight presence makes it ideal for the Raspberry Pi.

Read More

Linux Administration – News and Blog