Tag Archives: battery

Want Longer Battery Life on Linux? Try Fedora

Battery life on Linux is something of a weak spot in my opinion. It’s not abjectly terrible, but it’s not subjectively fantastic, either. So I’m stoked to hear that Red Hat (yes, them again) are hard at work trying to improve Linux battery life. Their engineers have beavered away on battery life variables to find the […]

This post, Want Longer Battery Life on Linux? Try Fedora, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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Battery Monitor app for Ubuntu now lets you create custom alerts

A new version of Battery Monitor, a background battery monitoring tool for Ubuntu, is available to download. The tool is designed for those who want to see notification alerts about battery status besides “battery low” and “battery critically low”. When running, Battery Monitor is able to show desktop alerts for different battery status events, including ‘now charging’ and ‘battery not charing’ (like macOS does). […]

This post, Battery Monitor app for Ubuntu now lets you create custom alerts, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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View Battery Usage on Your Ubuntu Laptop with CPU-G

battery-monitorMonitoring battery life of your Ubuntu laptop just got a touch easier. The Atareao team has added a new battery usage and information section to its fork of the CPU-G hardware information tool (think CPU-Z on Windows). You’re probably familiar with seeing a timeline power usage graph on your mobile device, be it Android, Ubuntu or iOS. […]

This post, View Battery Usage on Your Ubuntu Laptop with CPU-G, was written by Joey-Elijah Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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Battery Monitor Offers Ubuntu Notifications for Battery Events

battery-monitorIt doesn’t what sort of portable device you use, from laptop, to tablet, to phone: you know how crucial it is to monitor battery life.  Ubuntu ships with a battery applet, Indicator-Power, that is visible in the system tray area. It’s gives you a simple, easy way to gauge your current battery level, check charge information, and so […]

This post, Battery Monitor Offers Ubuntu Notifications for Battery Events, was written by Joey-Elijah Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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Power Management Tool `TLP` 0.8 Released

Ubuntu Laptop

TLP 0.8 was released recently, bringing various ThinkPad improvements, systemd “predictable network interface names” support along with other changes and bug fixes.
For those not familiar with TLP, this is an advanced power management tool that applies various settings and tweaks to help your laptop save battery power. The app tries to do everything automatically, depending on your Linux distribution and hardware (it runs in the background and doesn’t come with a GUI) however, you can manually change its settings by editing the TLP configuration file: /etc/default/tlp

A complete list of TLP features can be found HERE.

Changes in TLP 0.8:

  • General:
    • TLP_DEFAULT_MODE: change default operation mode to AC when no power supply can be detected (concerns some desktop and embedded hardware only)
  • Radio Devices:
    • Resume: restore bluetooth state
  • Radio Device Wizard (tlp-rdw):
    • Support ThinkPad OneLink Dock Basic/Pro for dock/undock events
    • Detect systemd “predictable network interface names” for WWAN
  • ThinkPad Battery:
    • tpacpi-bat: new upstream version 2.2: get ASL path from /sys/class/power_supply/*/device/path; avoids unnecessary “AE_NOT_FOUND” kernel messages
    • tlp-stat:
      • Show “No batteries detected.”
      • Explain battery status “Unknown” as “threshold effective”
      • Show battery cell group voltages (verbose mode, tp-smapi only)
      • Show acpi-call suggestion for ThinkPad *40, *50, X1 models
  • USB:
    • Remove USB_DRIVER_BLACKLIST
  • tlp-stat:
    • Show warnings for ata errors by default
  • Bugfixes
    • tlp-stat: detect kernel config with PM_RUNTIME=N
    • tlp recalibrate: fix exitcode check
    • USB autosuspend: write power/control if actually changing only
    • Ignore missing files in /proc/sys/fs/xfs

According to the changelog, the “USB_DRIVER_BLACKLIST” feature was removed because it caused issues with AC/BAT switching (the CPU governor didn’t change when going from AC to battery or the other way around) and USB hotplugging (required for udevd v221 and higher) – issue HERE.

Install TLP in Ubuntu or Linux Mint

To add the official TLP PPA and install the tool in Ubuntu or Linux Mint, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:linrunner/tlp
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install tlp tlp-rdw

TLP will automatically start upon system startup, but to avoid having to restart the system to get it running for the first time, you can start it (required only the first time) using the following command:
sudo tlp start

For more information about TLP, optional ThinkPad only packages you may whish yo install, etc., see our initial article about TLP and the TLP website.
For Debian, Fedora, Arch Linux, Gentoo or openSUSE installation instructions, see THIS page.
Report any bugs you may find @ GitHub.

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Advanced Power Management Tool `TLP` Sees New Release

TLP 0.7 was released recently, bringing an option which allows setting the minimum and maximum Intel P-state performance, better ThinkPad support and various other changes and bug fixes.

For those not familiar with TLP, this is an advanced power management tool that applies various settings and tweaks to help your laptop save battery power. The app tries to do everything automatically, depending on your Linux distribution and hardware (it runs in the background and doesn’t come with a GUI) however, you can manually change its settings by editing the TLP configuration file: /etc/default/tlp

The most important new feature in this TLP release is the addition of an option which allows defining the minimum and maximum P-state performance for Intel Core processors (values are stated as a percentage of the total available processor performance), intended to limit the power dissipation of the CPU (feature implemented by Pali Rohár). According to Thomas Koch, the TLP developer, this should be more effective than limiting frequencies.
This feature requires an Intel SandyBridge or newer CPU with “intel_pstate” scaling driver enabled.
To use this, in the TLP configuration file (/etc/default/tlp), uncomment the following lines (remove the “#”):
#CPU_MIN_PERF_ON_AC=0
#CPU_MAX_PERF_ON_AC=100
#CPU_MIN_PERF_ON_BAT=0
#CPU_MAX_PERF_ON_BAT=30
… and experiment with different values to see which suits your needs best. After making changes to the TLP configuration file, restart TLP by running “sudo tlp start”.

Other changes in the latest TLP 0.7 include:

  • USB:
    • USB_DRIVER_BLACKLIST: exclude devices assigned to the listed drivers from USB autosuspend; default: usbhid;
    • USB_BLACKLIST_WWAN: match internal driver list instead of USB vendor ids;
    • USB_WHITELIST: include devices into USB autosuspend even if already excluded by the driver or WWAN blacklists;
  • radio devices: DEVICES_TO_ENABLE_ON_AC/DISABLE_ON_BAT/DISABLE_ON_BAT_NOT_IN_USE: enable/disable radio devices upon change of power source (excluding connected devices) (feature implemented by Pali Rohár);
  • ThinkPad Battery:
    • provide proper return codes for all battery functions;
    • setcharge allowed on battery power;
    • do not activate new thresholds with force_discharge anymore (tp-smapi);
    • tpacpi-bat: support for ThinkPad E325 charge thresholds;
  • tlp-stat:
    • new options: -d|–disk, -e|–pcie, -p|–processor, -s|–system, -u|–usb;
    • show driver and connection state for all enabled radio devices;
    • show driver name in Runtime PM PCI(e) device list;
    • show type and state of docks and device bays;
    • show type of init system;
    • check if TLP’s systemd services are enabled;
  • RUNTIME_PM_DRIVER_BLACKLIST: exclude PCI(e) devices assigned to drivers;
  • support Dell Latitude docks (feature implemented by Pali Rohár);
  • added support for NM 0.9.10;
  • set performance versus energy savings policy (performance, normal, powersave – requires kernel modules msr and x86_energy_perf_policy from linux-tools);
  • fixed dock/undock event processing for ThinkPad Adv Mini Dock and Ultrabase;
  • use a more robust USB device event processing.

Install TLP in Ubuntu / Linux Mint

To avoid any conflicts with laptop-mode-tools, a tool similar to TLP, it’s recommended to remove it before installing TLP. In Ubuntu / Debian / Linux Mint, remove laptop-mode-tools using the following command:
sudo apt-get purge laptop-mode-tools

Ubuntu (14.10, 14.04 and 12.04) / Linux Mint (17.1, 17 and 13) users can install TLP by using its official PPA. Add the PPA and install the latest TLP by using the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:linrunner/tlp
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install tlp
TLP will start automatically but to avoid having to restart the system, the first time you can start it manually, by using the following command:
sudo tlp start

There are also some optional packages you can install – for more on that as well as more information about TLP, see: Improve Power Usage / Battery Life In Linux With TLP. Also see the TLP FAQ.

For how to install TLP in Fedora, Debian, Arch Linux or Gentoo, see the TLP installation page.

To download the source code, report bugs, etc., see the TLP GitHub page.
Thanks to Thomas for the tip! image via Canonical blog

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