Tag Archives: flash

Five Reasons to Switch to Flash Storage

By now you have heard your peers raving about flash storage. But perhaps you have not made the switch from your enterprise HDD storage solution yet, because of nagging questions you may have, about the cost of flash storage or its technical capabilities. Well here is a quick look at five compelling reasons why you should switch your enterprise storage from HDD to flash.

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How To Install Adobe Flash on Ubuntu

adobe flash linux logoAdobe began to offer their Flash Player plugin for Linux a couple of months back, 4 years after abandoning the platform.  In the years since the snub the web’s reliance on and use of Flash technologies has (thankfully) dwindled. But that doesn’t mean we live in halcyon days. Not every website, web service or web app/game has switched to using something newer or more […]

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How To Get Flash And H.264 To Work In Vivaldi Browser (Ubuntu, Linux Mint)

Vivaldi 1.0 stable was released today and if you gave it a try, you might have noticed, at least on a fresh Ubuntu installation, that Flash and H.264 don’t work out of the box.
Here’s how to get Adobe Flash and H.264 (used, for instance, by the YouTube HTML5 player) to work with Vivaldi browser, in Ubuntu, Linux Mint and derivatives.

Get Vivaldi browser to support H.264

Vivaldi Browser no H.264
Before installing “chromium-codecs-ffmpeg-extra”

Vivaldi Browser h.264 enabled
After installing “chromium-codecs-ffmpeg-extra”

To enable H.264 support for Vivaldi in Ubuntu, you need to install a package called “chromium-codecs-ffmpeg-extra”.
This is already available if Chromium browser is installed on your system. If you don’t have Chromium browser, you can install the package that provides H.264 support by using the following command:
sudo apt-get install chromium-codecs-ffmpeg-extra

And restart Vivaldi.

You can check if your browser supports H.264 by visiting the YouTube HTML5 page.

Get Adobe Flash working in Vivaldi Browser

Important note: since Google Chrome is now only available for 64bit on Linux, it means that its Pepper Flash plugin is also only available on 64bit. So the instructions below only work on 64bit! Flash might work on Vivaldi 32bit if you have an old Google Chrome for 32bit installed, but it won’t receive any updates so you shouldn’t use it.
Vivaldi supports the Google Chrome built-in Pepper Flash plugin, but it doesn’t come bundled with it. If you have Google Chrome installed on your system, Vivaldi should already be using its Pepper Flash plugin, so there’s nothing you need to do.
Vivaldi Browser pepper flash plugin
If Google Chrome is not installed on your system, to get Vivaldi browser to use the Google Chrome Pepper Flash plugin, you can install a package called “pepperflashplugin-nonfree”.

The package is available in Ubuntu 14.04, 15.04, 14.10 and 16.04 / Linux Mint 17.x and derivatives and you can install it by using the following command:

sudo apt-get install pepperflashplugin-nonfree

Then restart Vivaldi. That’s it!

Update: the pepperflashplugin-nonfree doesn’t work properly in Ubuntu 16.04 (there’s a bug report about this, HERE). For now, you you use Xenial, you can either use B.Jay’s workaround or simply install Google Chrome, which should make the Pepper Flash plugin available for Vivaldi. Hopefully the bug will be fixed soon.

Extra tip:

If Google Chrome is installed, Vivaldi will automatically pick up its Widevine Content Decryption plugin (it comes with a symbolic link to the location of the libwidevinecdm.so plugin in the Google Chrome stable installation folder).
If you don’t want to install Google Chrome and you need this plugin, you can extract libwidevinecdm.so from the Google Chrome deb and place it in /opt/vivaldi/, replacing the existing symbolic link.

thanks to B.Jay for the tip!

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Fresh Player Plugin Gets Hardware Accelerated Video Decoding Via VA-API And VDPAU

Fresh Player Plugin was updated recently with support for hardware accelerated video decoding via VA-API and VDPAU, along with video capture support (ALSA, JACK, PulseAudio) and other improvements.

Fresh Player Plugin is a wrapper that allows Linux users to use Pepper Flash from Google Chrome in Firefox and other NPAPI-compatible browsers. This is useful because the latest Flash Player is only available for Google Chrome (it comes bundled with it) on Linux, while other browsers, like Firefox, are stuck with an old Adobe Flash Player version (11.2).
Thanks to the new VA-API/VDPAU hardware accelerated video decoding available in the latest Fresh Player Plugin, Flash videos should use less CPU (because they’ll be using the GPU).
Here’s an example: with the same YouTube flash (you can use the HTML5 video player on YouTube, but this is for testing purposes) 1080p fullscreen video, I got a CPU usage of around 115% with Adobe Flash 11.2 without hardware accelerated video decoding and ~13% CPU usage using the latest Fresh Player plugin with accelerated video rendering (via VA-API) enabled:

Flash 11.2 (Firefox) without hardware acceleration

Fresh Player Plugin (with Flash 18 from Google Chrome, used in Firefox) with hardware accelerated video decoding enabled (VA-API)

Note that I edited the first screenshot: I manually added htop on top of the video (but what htop displays is real – it was running on my second monitor) because I couldn’t get it to stay on top with Flash 11.2.
Fresh Player Plugin supports hardware accelerated video decoding via VA-API and VDPAU, under Ubuntu 15.04 and 14.10 only, because it requires a newer libav version, which is not available in the official Ubuntu 14.04 (and older) repositories. Also, this is disabled by default “due to possible whole system lock-ups on some hardware“, so it might not work properly for everyone (but I didn’t encounter any issues in my test).

To enable hardware accelerated video decoding via VA-API and VDPAU (Ubuntu 14.10 and 15.04 only), copy the example freshplayerplugin configuration file from /usr/share/doc/freshplayerplugin to ~/.config/ (and remove “.example” from the filename) – to do this, simply use the following command in a terminal:

cp /usr/share/doc/freshplayerplugin/freshwrapper.conf.example ~/.config/freshwrapper.conf

Then open ~/.config/freshwrapper.conf with a text editor, search for “enable_hwdec = 0” and change its value from “0” to “1”. There are separate options for enabling/disabling VA-API and VDPAU too – look for “enable_vaapi” and “enable_vdpau” in the same file.

You’ll also need to install the VA-API / VDPAU driver for this to work. For Intel graphics, you’ll need to install the “i965-va-driver” package, for Nvidia you’ll need “libvdpau1” and for AMD graphics you’ll have to install “xvba-va-driver” (XvBA-based backend for VA API – AMD fglrx implementation). And of course, you’ll need the latest Fresh Player Plugin from GIT (available in the main WebUpd8 PPA).

If you want to check if everything was configured properly, load a YouTube flash video, right click it, select “Stats for nerds” and the frame that shows up should say “accelerated video rendering, accelerated video decoding” (like in the second screenshot above).

Note that I only tested this with an Intel graphics card / VA-API (and Ubuntu 15.04).

Install Fresh Player Plugin

If you use Ubuntu / Linux Mint and derivatives, you can install Fresh Player Plugin by using the main WebUpd8 PPA. For installation and configuration instruction, see: Install Fresh Player Plugin In Ubuntu Via PPA (Pepper Flash Wrapper For Firefox)

Arch Linux users can install the latest Fresh Player Plugin (Git) via AUR.

For other Linux distributions, you’ll have to compile it from source.

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Fresh Player Plugin Sees New Release (Pepper Flash Wrapper For Firefox)

As you probably know, the latest Adobe Flash Player is available on Linux only via Google Chrome (it’s bundled with it) while other browsers such as Firefox are stuck with an old 11.2 version.
The Adobe Flash Player plugin that’s bundled with Google Chrome is in the form of a PPAPI (or Pepper Plugin API) plugin and Mozilla isn’t interested in adding support for it. Because of this, Rinat Ibragimov has developed Fresh Player Plugin, a wrapper that allows Linux users to use Pepper Flash from Google Chrome in Firefox and other NPAPI-compatible browsers.

https://github.com/i-rinat/freshplayerplugin
A new Fresh Player Plugin version – 0.2.2 -, has just been released, bringing various improvements and new features:

  • implement Flash DRM interface. (Desktop PepperFlash doesn’t use it, you need one from ChromeOS);
  • fix malfunctioning nested submenus;
  • implement file chooser dialog;
  • fullscreen fixes, stop crashing on Alt-F4;
  • rework ALSA code, add optional PulseAudio support;
  • implement screen saver inhibition interface;
  • use GLX to create GL context, for both GL and GLES;
  • fix hangs caused by wrong nested message loop handling;
  • add quiet config option to decrease amount of output;
  • fix Referrer bug;

The most important change in this release is obviously the implementation of Flash DRM interface however, Pepper Flash that’s bundled with Google Chrome has the DRM-related code disabled on Linux so to use this, you need to extract Pepper Flash from Chrome OS, and that’s a pretty tedious process (instructions available here).
Furthermore, to get the Flash DRM interface to work, you must add “enable_3d = 1” to the freshwrapper.conf file or else you’ll get a black video, even on non-DRM content.

Here’s a Flash DRM test screenshot with the latest Fresh Player Plugin and Firefox, under Ubuntu 14.10:

Pepper Flash Firefox Ubuntu DRM Flash test

I should also mention that I’ve been using Fresh Player Plugin with Firefox for months, and pretty much everything works, though I only use a few Flash websites.

For more information about Fresh Player Plugin, bug reports, etc., see its GitHub page.

Getting Fresh Player Plugin

If you use Ubuntu / Linux Mint and derivatives, you can install Fresh Player Plugin by using the main WebUpd8 PPA. For installation and configuration instruction, see: Install Fresh Player Plugin In Ubuntu Via PPA (Pepper Flash Wrapper For Firefox)

Arch Linux users can install the latest Fresh Player Plugin (Git) via AUR.
For other Linux distributions, you’ll have to compile it from source.

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How To Get Flash And H.264 To Work In Opera Browser (Ubuntu 14.04, 14.10 and 15.04)

Opera 26 (stable) was released for Linux today and if you’ve tried it, you might have noticed that, at least on a pretty fresh Ubuntu installation, Flash and H.264 don’t work.
So here’s how to get Flash and H.264 (used for instance by the YouTube HTML5 player) to work with Opera on Ubuntu. The instructions below should work for all Opera (26 or newer) channels: stable, beta and developer.

How to get Flash working in Opera (Ubuntu)

Opera Linux Pepper Flash

Opera Linux Pepper Flash

Opera for Linux supports Pepper Flash, but it’s not bundled with it. There are two ways of installing Pepper Flash under Ubuntu (or Linux Mint, etc.) and thus, getting Flash to work in Opera:

1. Install Google Chrome

Pepper Flash comes bundled with Google Chrome so simply downloading and installing Google Chrome will get Flash to work in Opera on Ubuntu:

2. Install pepperflashplugin-nonfree

If you use Ubuntu 14.04, 14.10 and 15.04 (and of course, Linux Mint 17 or 17.1), you can install pepperflashplugin-nonfree, a package that provides Pepper Flash on Ubuntu (and Debian). To install it, use the following command:
sudo apt-get install pepperflashplugin-nonfree

How to enable H.264 in Opera browser under Ubuntu

Opera Linux h.264

To enable H.264 in Opera on Linux, you’ll need FFmpeg 2.3 or newer. FFmpeg was removed a while back from the official Ubuntu repositories but it has returned with Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet (currently under development). So if you use Ubuntu 15.04, to enable H.264 in Opera simply install FFmpeg:
sudo apt-get install ffmpeg

And restart Opera.

For Ubuntu 14.04 and 14.10, you can either compile FFmpeg yourself or use A PPA. One such PPA is Kyrill’s FFmpeg next PPA, which provides FFmpeg for Ubuntu 14.04 and 14.10, backported from Ubuntu 15.04. 
Because this PPA provides FFmpeg packages that don’t overwrite Libav, it shouldn’t break anything on your system (the new FFmpeg packages ships with renamed libraries, like “libavdevice-ffmpeg”, “libavutil-ffmpeg” and so on, so the packages can coexist with Libav from the Ubuntu repositories).

Note: before using this PPA, make sure the “ffmpeg-real” package from Sam Rog’s PPA isn’t installed, because the two aren’t compatible and dpkg will throw an error like: “trying to overwrite […] which is also in package“. So, to remove this package, use the following command:

sudo apt-get remove ffmpeg-real

And another note: Kyrill’s FFmpeg next PPA as well as FFmpeg from the Ubuntu 15.04 repositories doesn’t provide the -extra packages, so aac encoding is limited to ffmpeg’s native encoder, like Doug mentioned in a comment a while back. However, this won’t affect Opera.

To add Kyrill’s FFmpeg next PPA and install FFmpeg in Ubuntu 14.04 or 14.10 (or Linux Mint 17 or 17.1), use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kirillshkrogalev/ffmpeg-next
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install ffmpeg

And then simply restart Opera.

Another PPA which provides FFmpeg (for Ubuntu 14.04 only; this PPA overwrites Libav and I didn’t test the consequences of this) is Jon Severinsson’s FFmpeg PPA.

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