Tag Archives: gnome 3

Terminix Now Available In PPA For Ubuntu 16.04 And Linux Mint 18 [Quick Update]

Terminix GTK3 terminal emulator

Terminix (and its dependencies: ldc 1.1.0 and gtk-d) was uploaded to the Debian Sid repositories recently. To make it easier to install and stay up to date with the latest Terminix versions, I used the official Debian packaging (thanks to the packagers!) and created a Terminix PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 and Linux Mint 18.

Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak did not yet import ldc 1.1.0 from Debian, required to build Terminix, and it failed to build in my PPA for Yakkety (probably that’s why it’s not in Yakkety yet). Also, since Terminix requires GTK 3.14, it can’t be built for Ubuntu 14.04.
I should also mention that there was an attempt to create a snap package for Terminix, but without success so far.
In case you’re not familiar with Terminix, this is a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator that allows splitting terminals horizontally and vertically, and rearrange them using drag and drop. The layouts can be saved and restored. For more information about Terminix, see our initial article. Also check out its GitHub page.
To add the WebUpd8 Terminix PPA and install the app in Ubuntu 16.04, Linux Mint 18, and derivatives (32bit + 64bit), use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/terminix
sudo apt update
sudo apt install terminix

Extra tip: For additional Terminix themes, see THIS page.

Read More

GTK3 Tiling Terminal Emulator `Terminix` 1.1.0 Beta Released With UI Changes, Background Image Support

Almost two months after its first stable version, Terminix 1.1.0 beta was released today, bringing UI changes, support for background images and more.

Terminix GTK3 Tiling Terminal Emulator

In case you’re not familiar with Terminix, this is a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator. The application allows splitting terminals, both horizontally and vertically (which can be re-arranged using drag’n’drop), and it features options to save and restore the layouts.

The most important change in the latest Terminix 1.1.0 is probably the redesign of some parts of the application, making it less cluttered and more intuitive.
For instance, until now you had to look into a terminal’s title or context menu to create a new horizontal or vertical terminal split. That’s no longer the case and in Terminix 1.1.0 beta, there are two headerbar buttons that allow you to add a new terminal to the right or down.
Other UI changes include the addition of a find button in the headerbar, decluttered terminal menu, the session button no longer uses the new tab icon, which was confusing, and more.
You can read more about the design changes in Terminix 1.1.0 beta, HERE.

Terminix GTK3 Terminal Emulator
Terminix 1.1.0 with the default Ubuntu 16.04 wallpaper used as background image

Other changes in the latest Terminix 1.1.0 beta:

  • support for background images;
  • limited support for automatic profile switching;
  • option to globally disable shortcuts;
  • option to automatically copy text to clipboard when selecting;
  • support for a Visual Bell;
  • numerous bug fixes.

For a bit more information, including how to disable the client-side decorations and use a traditional titlebar, see our initial Terminix article.

Download Terminix

Download Terminix (source code and 64-bit binary – requires GTK 3.14+ and GTK VTE Widget 0.42, available with Ubuntu 15.04+)

To install the latest Terminix 1.1.0 beta 64bit binary in Ubuntu (15.04, 15.10, 16.04 or 16.10) or Linux Mint 18, you can use the following commands:
sudo apt-get install wget unzip libglib2.0-bin
cd /tmp
wget https://github.com/gnunn1/terminix/releases/download/1.1.0/terminix.zip
sudo unzip terminix.zip -d /
sudo glib-compile-schemas /usr/share/glib-2.0/schemas/

If the application doesn’t show up in the menu or its menu entry doesn’t have an icon, you can try to restart the session (logout/login), or run the following command to update the HiColor icon theme cache:
sudo gtk-update-icon-cache --ignore-theme-index -f -q /usr/share/icons/hicolor/

Or build it from source. For other Linux distributions, see THIS page.

Read More

New Version Of Linux Email Client `Geary` Released [PPA]

Geary is an email client that uses a simple, modern interface, especially created for GNOME 3. Geary 0.11.0, released today, includes new features, improved server compatibility and network reliability, and various bug fixes.

Geary email client GNOME Shell
Geary 0.11.0 in Ubuntu GNOME (GNOME Shell) 16.04

Geary features include:

  • quick account setup;
  • supports Gmail, Yahoo! Mail, Outlook.com, and popular IMAP servers (Dovecot, Cyrus, Zimbra, etc.);
  • mail organized by conversations;
  • ability to answer directly in conversations or open it in a separate window
  • signature support;
  • full-featured HTML mail composer;
  • fast keyword search with values like from:john;
  • desktop notification of new mail.

After Yorba Foundation, the open source company that developed Geary, stopped its activities, the future of the application was unclear. elementary OS, which was using Geary as its default email client, forked the project back in November 2015, continuing its development under the Pantheon Mail name.
In March 2016, Michael Gratton, an old Geary contributor, became an unofficial maintainer (until he can fulfill the GNOME membership application requirements), posting his patches to GNOME Bugzilla while still requiring Adam Dingle, Yorba founder, to commit them.
More about this @ Wikipedia.

Geary email client Ubuntu Unity
Geary 0.11.0 in Ubuntu (Unity) 16.04


Changes in Geary 0.11.0:

  • added archive special folder support;
  • added is:read, is:unread: is:starred search operators;
  • fixed using multiple search operators – to:, from:, etc.;
  • work around crashes caused by WebKitGTK+ 2.4.10;
  • fixed a crash when searching;
  • fixed images not being displayed in some HTML messages;
  • fixed empty main window when opened from notification;
  • fixed UI freezing when network connections are lost;
  • work better with Cyrus & other servers when network unreliable;
  • enabled the use of custom FTS3 tokeniser in SQLite 3.12 and later;
  • fixed inconsistent Composer ‘Detach’ button placement;
  • documentation improvements;
  • updated UI translations.

Install Geary in Ubuntu or Linux Mint

Geary is available in the official Debian / Ubuntu / Linux Mint (and derivatives) repositories – tough it’s not the latest version -, so to install it, simply use the following command:
sudo apt install geary

The version available in the official repositories is not the latest 0.11.0. To install Geary 0.11.0 in Ubuntu 16.04, 15.10 or 14.04, Linux Mint 18 or 17.x and derivatives, you can use its new official PPA. Add the PPA and install Geary using the commands below:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:geary-team/releases
sudo apt update
sudo apt install geary

Download Geary 0.11.0 source.

Thanks to Michael for the tip!

Read More

Terminix: Promising New Tiling Terminal Emulator For GNOME 3

Terminix is a new GTK3 tiling terminal emulator. The application, which is currently in beta, allows splitting terminals both horizontally and vertically, with re-arrangeable terminals using drag and drop, and options to save and restore terminal layouts.

Terminix GTK3 tiling terminal emulator

Just like GNOME Terminal, Terminix uses the GTK VTE Widget, so it shares its features, to which it adds its own, like the terminal split functionality, a sidebar that displays terminal sessions with thumbnails (see screenshot above),  support for transparency, and more.

Terminix features:

  • layout terminals in any fashion by splitting them horizontally or vertically
  • terminals can be re-arranged using drag and drop both within and between windows;
  • terminals can be detached into a new window via drag and drop;
  • input can be synchronized between terminals so commands typed in one terminal are replicated to the others;
  • the grouping of terminals can be saved and loaded from disk;
  • rerminals support custom titles;
  • color schemes are stored in files and custom color schemes can be created by simply creating a new file;
  • transparent background;
  • supports notifications when processes are completed out of view. Requires the Fedora notification patches for VTE.

The application follows the Gnome Human Interface Guidelines and as a result, it uses a header bar (client-side decorations), but there’s an option to disable it and use a traditional titlebar (via DConf: com > gexperts > Terminix > disable-csd). However, this didn’t work properly in my test under Ubuntu with Unity: after disabling CSD, the application window became completely transparent in both Ubuntu 15.10 and 16.04.
So for now, Terminix requires a desktop environment that supports client-side decorations.
Also, the application requires GTK 3.14 or later and GTK VTE Widget 0.42, so it only runs on Ubuntu 15.04 (and derivatives: Ubuntu GNOME, Xubuntu, etc.) and newer. The application does not work in Linux Mint 17.x, Ubuntu 14.04, elementary OS Freya, etc.
Below you’ll find a few more Terminix screenshots:
Terminix GTK3 tiling terminal emulator
Terminix in GNOME Shell (Ubuntu 16.04) with Solarized Dark color scheme, terminal transparency

Terminix GTK3 tiling terminal emulator

Terminix GTK3 tiling terminal emulator
Terminix in Xfce (Xubuntu 16.04)

WOGUE (check out their G+ page and YouTube channel) created a nice Terminix video a while back, and even though it’s not the latest Terminix version, it should be enough to gen an idea on how the application works:


(direct video link)

Download Terminix

Download Terminix (source code and 64-bit binary – requires GTK 3.14+ and GTK VTE Widget 0.42)

Arch Linux users can install Terminix via AUR.

On Fedora 23 and CentOS 7, you can install Terminix via the openSUSE Build Service.

To download and install the Terminix 64-bit binary on Ubuntu GNOME 16.04, 15.10 or 15.04 (and other flavors that fully support client-side decorations, like Xubuntu), you can use the following commands:
sudo apt-get install wget unzip libglib2.0-bin
cd /tmp
wget https://github.com/gnunn1/terminix/releases/download/0.53.0/terminix.zip
sudo unzip terminix.zip -d /
sudo glib-compile-schemas /usr/share/glib-2.0/schemas/

Terminix is currently in beta, so you’ll probably encounter bugs! Report any bug you may find @ GitHub.

via Reddit

Read More

Fedora 22 Released, See What`s New [Workstation]

Fedora 22 workstation screenshots

Fedora 22 Workstation was released today and it ships with the latest stable GNOME 3.16, a new default package manager and other interesting changes. Let’s take a look at what’s new!

GNOME 3.16

Fedora 22 Workstation ships with GNOME 3.16 by default and the most important change in this release is probably the new notification system, which has replaced the old Message Tray.
In GNOME 3.16, the notification history can now be accessed from the date/time menu (the calendar widget from the Top Bar):

Fedora 22 workstation screenshots

… while legacy “tray” icons are displayed in an expandable “drawer” that uses autohide and it’s available in the bottom left corner of the screen:

Fedora 22 workstation screenshots

Furthermore, the notification popups, called “banners”, are now displayed at the top of the screen:

Fedora 22 workstation screenshots

In the screenshot above you should notice a dot next to the date/time indicator – this indicates unread notifications.

Other changes in GNOME 3.16 include:

  • refreshed GNOME Shell theme (including monochrome icons for the applications menu);
  • scrollbars are displayed only when needed (see screenshot below);
  • GTK+ 3.16:
    • OpenGL support;
    • themes can now simultaneously support multiple GTK+ versions, by including version-specific CSS;
    • a new widget called GtkPopoverMenu was added and it can be used for creating menus contained with popovers;
    • many GTK+ Inspector changes including a much improved user interface;
  • GNOME apps:
    • GNOME’s Image Viewer has been redesigned and it now uses header bars;
    • Files (Nautilus) 3.16 comes with bigger icons/thumbnails by default, reorganized menus, improved grid and list views as well as a new popover for changing between views, zoom level and sort order. Also, with the latest Files app, users can now move files and folders to the trash using the Delete key instead of Ctrl + Delete, like in previous versions;
    • Installation of GStreamer codecs, fonts, and certain document types is now handled by Software;
    • Maps can now display information bubbles which show the address, wheelchair accessibility along with links to Wikipedia articles. Also, the latest GNOME Maps comes with built-in Foursquare support, which allows you to check-in;
    • Calculator now displays previous calculations so you can easily copy previous figures;
    • Boxes comes with an updated properties interface, a new menu makes it possible to send keyboard shortcuts that cannot be entered directly into a box and more;
    • smart playlists have been added to Music, so you can view frequently played and recently added tracks. It is now also possible to star your favorite tracks;
    • two new games were added: a sliding blocks game called Taquin and 2048;
    • three new preview applications were added: Calendar (which already comes with Google Calendar sync), Characters (character map application) and Books (e-book viewer) – these are not installed by default in Fedora 22 but are available in the repositories;
    • a new IDE for GNOME, called “Builder”, is now available as an early preview (it’s not installed by default but it’s available in the repositories).

See our GNOME 3.16 article for more information (including a video).
Here are a few screenshots with some of the changes mentioned above, taken under Fedora 22 Workstation:

Fedora 22 workstation screenshots

Fedora 22 workstation screenshots

Fedora 22 workstation screenshots

Fedora 22 workstation screenshots

Fedora 22 workstation screenshots

Other changes

Fedora 22 Workstation includes quite a few under the hood changes, including a new default package manager: DNF (under the hood, it uses an improved dependency solver, called hawkey, along with librepo for repository operations and libcomps for package groups), which has replaced Yum.

DNF provides better performance and memory footprint along with a “strict API definition for plugins and extending projects”, notes the Fedora 22 release announcement.

Most DNF commands are similar to Yum (and /usr/bin/yum now redirects to /usr/bin/dnf, with a deprecation notice) and the same RPM package repositories are used however, there are some differences:
  • updates that don’t work are skipped – this is similar to Yum’s “–skip-broken” (which isn’t available for DNF), but it evaluates the impact of the problem against the entire transaction;
  • repositories that don’t work are skipped;
  • dependencies are not upgraded on package installation;
  • when removing a package, DNF will automatically remove any dependent packages that were not explicitly installed by the user;
  • by default, DNF will check for updates in configured repositories hourly, starting ten minutes after the system boots;
  • unlike with Yum, DNF allows removing all kernel packages, including running package.

Even more changes:

  • the Software tool and PackageKit now support searching for packages in disabled repositories;
  • Fedora 22 introduces the Preupgrade Assistant (not installed by default), a diagnostics utility which assesses the system for possible in-place upgrade limitations and provides a report with the analysis results;
  • GDM uses Wayland by default, instead of Xorg, bringing the transition to Wayland one step closer. The default GNOME session continues to use X;
  • input devices use a new driver: “libinput”, which replaces other drivers such as synaptics, and provides improved support for multi-touch devices and software emulated buttons (this is only installed by default on new Fedora 22 installations);
  • The default console font has been changed to eurlatgr in Fedora 22. The new font has the same typeface as the previously used latarcyrheb-sun16 font, but supports a broader range of characters from the Latin and Greek alphabets as well as some commonly used symbol;
  • The Terminal now notifies you when a long running job completes (this is a Fedora-specific feature, that’s why I didn’t include it in the GNOME 3.16 changes above).

Default packages

Fedora 22 workstation screenshots

Fedora 22 Workstation ships with Firefox 38.0.1, LibreOffice 4.4.3.2, Shotwell 0.22.0, Rhythmbox 3.2.1, Transmission 2.84, Empathy 3.12.10 along with version 3.16.x of the core GNOME applications (Nautilus, Gedit, Terminal and so on), on top of GNOME Shell 3.16.2 and GTK+ 3.16.3.
Under the hood, Fedora 22 Workstation uses the Linux Kernel 4.0.4, systemd 209, Mesa 10.5.4 and Xorg Server 1.17.1.

Download Fedora 22

Before installing Fedora 22, make sure you check out the common bugs list and the official release notes.

Download Fedora

It’s also important to mention that three new websites were released along with Fedora 22 today:

To easily install codecs, Java and various popular apps that aren’t available in the Fedora repositories, along with tweaks such as improved font rendering, you can use Fedy, a Fedora post-install utility which was updated to version 4.0 recently and it already supports Fedora 22.

info via

Read More

GNOME 3.16 Released With New Notification System, Updated Visuals [Video, Screenshots]

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

GNOME 3.16 was released today and it includes some important changes, like a new notification system, updated visuals, 3 new preview applications and much more. Read on to find out what’s new!

GNOME 3.16 video

Below you can watch a video which presents some of the changes in the latest GNOME 3.16:

(direct video link; for more videos, subscribe to our YouTube channel)
Note that I used VirtualBox for the video, that’s why you might notice some lag at times. Also, Maps is not present in the video because it crashes in VirtualBox.

Changes in GNOME 3.16

GNOME 3.16 brings a long-awaited change: a new notification system, which has replaced the old Message Tray. The notification history can now be accessed from the date/time menu (Top Bar):

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

Furthermore, the date/time menu was redesigned and besides displaying the notifications history, the calendar can now also show world times, as you can see in the screenshot above.
Since the notification history is now displayed at the top, the notification popups (called “banners”) were also moved and are now displayed at the top of the screen:

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

As for legacy “tray” icons, they can still be accessed in GNOME 3.16 and they are displayed in a “drawer” that uses autohide in the bottom left corner of the screen:

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

To see the new legacy tray in action, see the video above.

Also, the new notifications, the media player controls were removed but they may be reintroduced with GNOME 3.18.
Another important change in GNOME 3.16 is related to the visuals: the Activities Overview, login/lock screen, system menus and others have received an updated design (including monochrome icons for the applications menu):

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

GNOME 3.16 screenshots
With GNOME 3.16, the scrollbars were tweaked and instead of being displayed all the time, like in the previous GNOME versions, the new GNOME 3.16 scrollbars are displayed only when needed:

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

The latest GTK+ 3.16 has received quite a few improvements, such as:

  • OpenGL support;
  • GTK+ now includes a display system backend for the Mir display server;
  • themes can now simultaneously support multiple GTK+ versions, by including version-specific CSS;
  • a new widget called GtkPopoverMenu was added and it can be used for creating menus contained with popovers;
  • many GTK+ Inspector changes including a much improved user interface.

Other changes include:

  • the initial setup assistant now includes a section on privacy controls;
  • updated high contrast accessible theme;
  • search has been added to the standard file chooser dialog;
  • Wayland improvements, such as support for input configuration and pointer barries – with these changes, the Wayland port is “approaching its final stages”;
  • many other minor improvements and tweaks.

GNOME applications

With this release, GNOME’s Image Viewer has been redesigned and it now uses header bars (client-side decorations):

GNOME 3.16 screenshots
Files (Nautilus) 3.16 comes with bigger icons/thumbnails by default, reorganized menus, improved grid and list views as well as a new popover for changing between views, zoom level and sort order:

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

Also, with the latest Files app, users can now move files and folders to the trash using the Delete key instead of Ctrl + Delete, like in previous versions (in Ubuntu for instance, Nautilus was patched to allow this in previous versions). To accompany this change, a new, easy to discover undo feature was added:

GNOME 3.16 screenshots
Another application that has received special attention for this release is Maps, which can now display information bubbles which can display the address, wheelchair accessibility along with links to Wikipedia articles. Also, the latest GNOME Maps comes with built-in Foursquare support, which allows you to check-in (to be able to use it, you must add your Foursquare account to Online Accounts).

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

Other changes in Maps include:
  • contact search: if contacts have address information associated with them, you can search for them directly from Maps
  • improved state handling: Maps now gracefully responds when there is no network connection, or when location services are turned off
  • route drag and drop: it is now possible to adjust routes by dragging them on the map

Changes in other GNOME apps:
  • Calculator now displays previous calculations so you can easily copy previous figures;
  • Boxes comes with an updated properties interface, a new menu makes it possible to send keyboard shortcuts that cannot be entered directly into a box and more;
  • smart playlists have been added to Music, so you can view frequently played and recently added tracks. It is now also possible to star your favorite tracks;
  • Photos and Music have received performance improvements;
  • improved GNOME Document Viewer sidebar;
  • in Contacts, maps are now shown for contact addresses;
  • automatic codecs installation has been integrated into Software;
  • two new games were added: a sliding blocks game called Taquin and 2048.
With GNOME 3.16, there are three new preview applications: Calendar (which already comes with Google Calendar sync), Characters (character map application) and Books (e-book viewer):

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

Furthermore, as a result of a successful crowdfunding campaign, a new IDE for GNOME, called “Builder”, is now available as an early preview, and it already features split view, snippets, auto-indentation and a VIM engine but many more features should be added in the future, like project management, debugging, version tracking, Glade integration and others:

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

And finally, this GNOME release includes a new application, called MultiWriter, which can be used for writing image files to multiple USB devices:

GNOME 3.16 screenshots

Getting GNOME 3.16

GNOME 3.16 should be available by default in Fedora 22 (currently in alpha) and the next openSUSE release (scheduled for 2015).
Arch Linux users can find the latest GNOME 3.16 in the GNOME unstable repository.
Ubuntu (GNOME) 15.04, which will be released next month, won’t include GNOME 3.16 but GNOME 3.14. However, GNOME 3.16 will probably be available with Ubuntu 15.10. The GNOME 3 Staging PPA is in the process of being updated to GNOME 3.16 for Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet, but it’s nowhere near ready yet.
GNOME 3.16 isn’t yet available in Debian, with 3.14 being available in both jessie (testing) and sid (unstable).
If you want to try GNOME 3.16, you can do it already by using the official GNOME promo ISO (based on openSUSE):

 info and the Maps and MultiWriter screenshots via GNOME release notes

Read More

How To Install GNOME 3.14 In Ubuntu GNOME 14.10

GNOME 3.14 was released back in September and it includes some interesting changes like multi-touch gestures for both the system and applications, re-worked default theme, new animations as well as various enhancements for the code GNOME applications. More information HERE.

GNOME 3.14 Ubuntu 14.10

Unfortunately, Ubuntu GNOME 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) ships with GNOME 3.12 for the most part (there are even some GNOME 3.10 packages, like Gedit or Nautilus) but, as usual, you can install the latest GNOME (3.14) by using a PPA.

Unlike previous versions, installing GNOME 3.14 from the GNOME 3 Staging PPA in Ubuntu 14.10 doesn’t break Unity however, there are things that don’t work as they should, like:
  • very large icons for some apps in Unity Dash and other places – screenshot;
  • the default Ubuntu theme (Ambiance) doesn’t work properly with some applications (screenshot) and Adwaita doesn’t support Unity’s CSS window decorations so you’ll have to use a theme that supports GTK 3.14 and Unity, like Zukitwo, but even then you may encounter various issues like up/down arrows for indicators (screenshot);
  • Nautilus, Totem and Gedit use client-side decorations and the default GNOME menu, so they will look out of place in Unity.

And that’s just on a first look so there might be many other issues. That’s why I don’t recommend using this PPA if you’re using Unity!
As usual, the latest GNOME is available in the GNOME 3 Staging PPA and it’s not considered ready for general use (you will encounter bugs!), so make sure you read the PPA description before using it. Follow the instructions below on your own risk and only if you know how to fix your system in case something goes wrong!

There are two more things I should mention, so you’ll know what to expect:

  • on my laptop running Ubuntu 14.10, applications that use client-side decorations have a large shadow at the bottom (screenshot). This didn’t occur in the two virtual machines I’ve tested the GNOME 3.14 installation under Ubuntu 14.10, but you may encounter this bug, and I didn’t find out what’s causing it;
  • CSD applications have minimize and maximize buttons for some reason, even though GNOME doesn’t use this by default – you can disable them via GNOME Tweak Tool  > Windows > Titlebar Buttons.

Install GNOME 3.14 in Ubuntu GNOME 14.10

Warning: Please read the output before entering ‘Y’ for the “dist-upgrade” command below to make sure important packages won’t be removed and if the “dist-upgrade” command tries to remove important pages, abort the installation and remove the PPA! Also, it’s a good idea to save the list of packages upgraded by using the instructions below, in case you want to revert the changes and ppa-purge fails.
Currently, only the GNOME 3 Staging PPA is required to upgrade to GNOME 3.14 in Ubuntu 14.10 however, some packages might be moved to the GNOME 3 PPA later on and that might break things if you didn’t enable this PPA on your system, that’s why by following the instructions below, you’ll add both the GNOME 3 PPA and the GNOME 3 Staging PPA.

That said, let’s proceed

1. Install GNOME 3.14

To add the GNOME 3 and GNOME 3 Staging PPAs and upgrade to GNOME 3.14 in Ubuntu GNOME 14.10, use the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3-staging
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

During the GNOME 3.14 upgrade (or purge) process, you may encounter an issue similar to this:

(gtk-update-icon-cache-3.0:29077): GdkPixbuf-WARNING **: Cannot open pixbuf loader module file '/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/gdk-pixbuf-2.0/2.10.0/loaders.cache': No such file or directory

This likely means that your installation is broken.
Try running the command
gdk-pixbuf-query-loaders > /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/gdk-pixbuf-2.0/2.10.0/loaders.cache
to make things work again for the time being.

If that happens, firstly install libgdk-pixbuf2.0-dev:

sudo apt-get install libgdk-pixbuf2.0-dev

And then fix this issue by running the following commands:

– 32bit:

sudo -i
gdk-pixbuf-query-loaders > /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/gdk-pixbuf-2.0/2.10.0/loaders.cache
exit

– 64bit:

sudo -i
gdk-pixbuf-query-loaders > /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/gdk-pixbuf-2.0/2.10.0/loaders.cache
exit

2. Reboot (a simple logout / login may not be enough so to avoid any issues, reboot your system).
3. (Optional) Install GNOME 3 applications not available by default in Ubuntu GNOME 14.10.

GNOME 3.14 apps

You may also want to install the GNOME 3 apps which are not available by default in Ubuntu GNOME 14.10 (Polari, Bijiben, Clocks, Sound Recorder, etc.) – install them using the command below:
sudo apt-get install polari gnome-sound-recorder bijiben gnome-clocks gnome-music gnome-photos gnome-boxes

(Epiphany is still at version 3.12.0)

How to revert the changes

If for whatever reason you want to revert the changes made by adding the GNOME 3 and GNOME 3 Staging PPAs, you can purge them (purging a PPA downgrades all the packages from that PPA to the version available in the official Ubuntu repositories and disables the PPA) using ppa-purge:
sudo apt-get install ppa-purge
sudo ppa-purge ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3
sudo ppa-purge ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3-staging

Read More

Ubuntu Flavors 14.10 Officially Released

All the Ubuntu flavors reached version 14.10 today. Let’s take a quick look at what’s new in Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Kubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn).

Xubuntu 14.10

Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn

Xubuntu is an Ubuntu flavor which uses Xfce, a fast, light desktop environment.

Changes in Xubuntu 14.10:

  • the display dialog has been updated and it now allows arranging multiple displays by drag and drop;
  • the Xfce power manager can now control the keyboard-backlight and features a new panel plugin, which shows the battery status, other connected devices with batteries and controls the display backlight brightness;
  • Setting-related menu items earlier available only under Settings manager are now shown and searchable in Whisker Menu;
  • the alt-tab dialog can now be clicked with the mouse to select a window;
  • updated GTK themes with various changes, including GTK 3.12 support;
  • changed desktop icon size to 48px, desktop tooltip size to 64px;
  • the number of desktops was reduced to 1 by default, but this can easily be changed (Settings > Workspaces);
  • saner defaults for DPMS timeouts;
  • enabled lock-screen on suspend and hibernate;
  • Light Locker is enabled and will lock on suspend, but not auto-locking after being idle;
  • to allow users to use pkexec instead of gksu(do), appropriate profiles are now included for Thunar and Mousepad;
  • enabled clutter as default videosink in Parole;
  • updated panel layout for login screen;
  • enabled minimize and maximize on GtkHeaderbars;
  • XChat is no longer included by default;
  • Inxi, a tool to gather system information, is now included by default.

Here are screenshots with some of these changes:

Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn
Added minimize and maximize buttons for apps using header bars

Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn
Inxi, a system info tool

Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn
Xfce4 Power Manager

Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn
New Xfce4 Power Manager panel plugin

Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn
Xubuntu 14.10 login screen (LightDM GTK greeter)

Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn
Display settings

Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn
Running Thunar via pkexec

Also, Xubuntu 14.10 uses magenta highlights:

Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn

According to the release notes, this change (which they refer to as pink but it looks closer to magenta to me) was made to celebrate the 14.10 codename “Utopic Unicorn” and to demonstrate the easy customizability of Xubuntu.
That’s because this change wasn’t made to the theme – the pink/magenta highlights are applied via Theme Configuration (gtk-theme-config) and is used no matter what theme you’re using. You can easily change this and other theme colors from Settings > Theme Configuration (simply turn “Highlight Colors” off to turn this off):

Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn

Ubuntu GNOME 14.10

Ubuntu GNOME tries to bring a pure GNOME experience in the Ubuntu “family”. It uses GNOME Shell by default and this release ships with a combination of GNOME 3.10 and 3.12.

Ubuntu GNOME 14.10
Ubuntu GNOME 14.10 includes GNOME System Settings / Settings Daemon 3.12

Changes in Ubuntu GNOME 14.10:

  • many GNOME components, like GNOME Shell, GTK+, GNOME Control Center, etc. have been updated to version 3.12 which brings improvements (compared to 3.10, available in Ubuntu 14.04) such as:
    • proper HiDPI support;
    • improved network menus;
    • Jumplists (also known as Quicklists in Unity) support;
    • a geolocation indicator was added to the status menu
    • refined animations;
    • window previews are now keyboard navigable;
    • allow specifying monitor for OSD;
    • GNOME Online accounts has better Facebook and Google support and also, it now supports Pocket (a web service that lets you save videos, articles and pretty much anything from the browser for later use)
    • Google Cloud print support;
    • updated Adwaita GTK theme: new style for tabs and buttons, etc.;
    • GTK 3.12 introduces restyled tabs and “popovers”, an overlayed bubble interface element;
    • for more information, see our GNOME 3.12 article (but keep in mind that some apps, like Nautilus, Totem or Gedit are still at version 3.10.x).
  • GNOME Maps (3.12.2) and GNOME Weather (3.12.1) are now installed by default.

Here are a few Ubuntu GNOME 14.10 screenshots:

Ubuntu GNOME 14.10

Ubuntu GNOME 14.10

Ubuntu GNOME 14.10

Ubuntu GNOME 14.10

Lubuntu 14.10

Lubuntu is a lightweight Ubuntu flavor which uses the LXDE desktop environment, useful for old computers.

Lubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn

For Lubuntu 14.10, there’s basically no changelog available – besides updated artwork, the wiki page mentions that many LXDE components have been updated with bug fix releases and that Lubuntu 14.10 is a “general bug fix release as we prepare for LXQt”.

Kubuntu 14.10

Kubuntu is an Ubuntu flavor which uses the KDE Plasma Desktop as the graphical environment. Even though it’s now sponsored by Blue Systems and not by Canonical, Kubuntu is still an official Ubuntu derivative.
For 14.10, there are two Kubuntu ISOs available for download: Plasma 4 Stable and Plasma 5 tech Preview.
The Stable Plasma 4 ISO includes KDE Applications and Platform 4.14.1 – check out the changes here: 4.14.0 | 4.14.1.
Here are a few Kubuntu 14.10 screenshots (mostly with the Plasma 5 ISO since the default Kubuntu 14.10 with Plasma 4 looks pretty much the same):

Kubuntu 14.10 Plasma 5
Kubuntu 14.10 with Plasma 5

Kubuntu 14.10 Plasma 5
Kubuntu 14.10 with Plasma 5

Kubuntu 14.10 Plasma 5
Kubuntu 14.10 with Plasma 5 (with Breeze window decorations – Oxygen is still default though)

Kubuntu 14.10 Plasma 4
Kubuntu 14.10 with Plasma 4
Download Kubuntu 14.10 (includes the official release notes)
For changes shared between all the Ubuntu flavors (Linux kernel changes, etc.), see our Ubuntu 14.10 article.

Read More

Install Ambiance And Radiance Themes With Fixed Header Bars For GNOME 3.12 [Ubuntu GNOME]

Ubuntu GNOME with GTK/GNOME Shell 3.12: if you’re an Ubuntu GNOME user, you’re most probably aware that Ambiance and Radiance (the default Ubuntu themes) don’t support GNOME Shell and applications that use header bars look broken. Well, Leo Iannacone has fixed the default Ubuntu themes to work properly under GNOME 3.12.

Here are a couple of screenshots taken under GNOME Shell / GTK+ 3.12 (Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn) with fixed Ambiance and Radiance themes, using proper header bars (client side decorations):

Ambiance GNOME header bars

Radiance GNOME header bars

Unfortunately, Leo’s fixed Ubuntu themes don’t work properly with Unity. For instance, the Nautilus toolbar/pathbar looks pretty weird. So I recommend using them only with GNOME Shell (Ubuntu GNOME).

Since the default Ubuntu themes don’t ship with GNOME Shell themes, you can use Ambiance-Gnome ad Radiance-Gnome, which I’ve uploaded to the Webupd8 Themes PPA so you can easily install them in Ubuntu 14.04 (if you’ve upgraded to GNOME 3.12) or 14.10:

Ambiance GNOME Shell

Ambiance GNOME Shell

Radiance GNOME Shell

Radiance GNOME Shell

Install Ambiance and Radiance fixed for GTK+ 3.12 in Ubuntu GNOME

These Ambiance and Radiance themes only work with GNOME/GTK+ 3.12 which is available in a PPA for Ubuntu 14.04 and in the official Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn repositories. Don’t install the themes if you’re using a different GNOME version!

To install Ambiance And Radiance fixed for GNOME/GTK 3.12 in Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 or 14.10, you can use Leo’s PPA:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:l3on/ubuntu-themes-gnome-shell
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install light-themes

Non-Ubuntu users can download Ambiance and Radiance fixed for GNOME (3.12) from Launchpad (bzr).

If you want to revert the changes, use the following commands:
sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/l3on-ubuntu-themes-gnome-shell*
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install light-themes/trusty

(or use ppa-purge to purge the PPA, but I’ve added manual instructions because ppa-purge seems to be failing pretty often lately)

To change the theme to Ambiance/Radiance, use GNOME Tweak Tool (under “Appearance”, set the Window ad GTK+ theme to Ambiance or Radiance)

Install Ambiance and Radiance GNOME Shell themes

If you’re looking for matching Ambiance and Radiance GNOME Shell themes, you can use DarkBeastOfPrey’s themes which, just like the fixed Ambiance and Radiance GTK themes, are for GNOME Shell 3.12 only.

You can install these themes by using the WebUpd8 Themes PPA. Add the PPA and install Ambiance and Radiance GNOME Shell themes using the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/themes
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install ambiance-gnome radiance-gnome

Or, download the themes from Gnome Look: Ambiance-Gnome | Radiance-Gnome, extract the downloaded archive and copy them to ~/.themes/

To be able to change the GNOME Shell theme, you’ll need to install the official GNOME Shell extensions:
sudo apt-get install gnome-shell-extensions
Then, open GNOME Tweak Tool and on the “Extensions” tab, enable the “User themes” extension and restart GNOME Shell (ALT+ F2 and enter “r”). And finally, set the GNOME Shell theme to Ambiance-Gnome or Radiance-Gnome via GNOME Tweak Tool (Appearance > Shell theme).

Read More

How To Disable GTK3 Client-Side Decorations (Header Bars)

Starting with GNOME 3.10, some GNOME applications have switched to “header bars” or “client-side decorations“. These CSD (client-side decorations) don’t work properly in some desktop environments / shells – for instance, in Ubuntu 14.04, Unity doesn’t support CSD and because of this, some applications look broken. Luckily, there is now a relatively easy way (unofficial) of disabling client-side decorations. Read on!

In Ubuntu, Nautilus and a few other GNOME apps are patched so they don’t use client-side decorations under Unity. However, not all applications were fixed – here are a few examples:

GNOME Clocks

Latest gThumb 3.3.2 (gThumb from the Ubuntu repositories was downgraded when the Ubuntu devs noticed it’s using CSD)

GNOME Maps

PCMan, one of the LXDE founders, has created gtk3-nocsd, a small module which can be used to disable the GTK+3 client-side decorations. gtk3-nocsd can achieves this by letting GTK think there’s no compositor available, in which case the CSD fail to start.

Here are the same 3 applications as above, with gtk3-nocsd (so with disabled client-side decorations):

There are a couple of issues though. The first one is that this solution seems to work with most, but not all CSD applications – in my test, GNOME Weather continued to use client-side decorations even after using gtk3-nocsd. And the second issue is that the CSD close button isn’t removed when the client-side decorations are disabled:

Install gtk3-nocsd

Ubuntu 14.04 or 14.10 users can install gtk3-nocsd by using the main WebUpd8 PPA. To add the PPA and install gtk3-nocsd, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install gtk3-nocsd

Or, if you don’t want to add the PPA, download the gtk3-nocsd deb from HERE.
Other Linux distributions: grab the gtk3-nocsd code from GitHub, make sure pkg-config and gtk+3-dev are installed and compile it using “./build.sh”.
Simply installing gtk3-nocsd won’t disable the GTK3 client-side decorations. See the example below for how to use it.

Disable GTK3 client-side decorations using gtk3-nocsd (example)

To be able to use gtk3-nocsd, you need to preload the gtk3-nocsd.so file (which is installed under /usr/lib/gtk3-nocsd/ if you’ve used the Ubuntu PPA mentioned above) using LD_PRELOAD.

The gtk3-nocsd GitHub page suggests adding the following to ~/.profile:

export GTK_CSD=0
export LD_PRELOAD=/path/to/gtk3-nocsd.so

However, by using this, Unity failed to start in my test so I strongly recommend against using it this way unless you know what you’re doing and you’re not using Unity! Instead, you can simply add LD_PRELOAD to the desktop file, which won’t affect the environment.

Here’s an example: to disable the client-side decorations for gThumb 3.3.2, open its desktop file as root with a text editor (I’ll use Gedit below):

gksu gedit /usr/share/applications/gthumb.desktop

And in this file, search for the line that starts with “Exec=” and right after “=” and before “gthumb”, add the following (without removing anything!):
env LD_PRELOAD=/usr/lib/gtk3-nocsd/gtk3-nocsd.so

After editing gthumb.desktop, the “Exec=” line should look like this:

Exec=env LD_PRELOAD=/usr/lib/gtk3-nocsd/gtk3-nocsd.so gthumb %U

In the same way you can disable client-side decorations for any application you want: GNOME Clocks, GNOME Maps, etc.

Read More