Tag Archives: ubuntu

Tool To Create Bootable Windows USB Stick From Linux `WinUSB` (Fork) Renamed To `WoeUSB`, Sees New Release

The WinUSB fork we covered a while back was renamed to WoeUSB recently, while also seeing quite a few releases for the past few days.

WoeUSB

WoeUSB / WinUSB is a tool that can be used to create a bootable Windows installer USB stick from an ISO or DVD. The application supports Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, as well Windows 10, and can be used either with a GUI or from the command line.

As for supported bootmodes, WoeUSB / WinUSB can create a bootable Windows USB installation stick using the following:
  • Legacy / MBR-style / IBM PC compatible bootmode;
  • Native UEFI booting is supported for Windows 7 and later images (with a limitation: only FAT filesystem can be used as the target filesystem).

Since it was forked from Colin Gille’s WinUSB, the application has seen a major code refactoring, bug fixes as well as some minor new features. The changes include:
  • support for both wxWidgets 2 and 3;
  • use pkexec instead of gksudo for privilege escalation;
  • UEFI boot support;
  • numerous bug fixes.

Some newer WoeUSB changes include:

  • support customizing the –label of the newly created filesystem in –format mode;
  • implement checking on target filesystem in –install mode;
  • command line: check if target media is busy before continuing and bail out when the target partition is mounted;
  • support Linux distributions that uses “grub2” as prefix name, such as Fedora;
  • –install and –format installation options are deprecated in favor of –partition and –device, to be more clear what both options will do. The old options will still be available until WoeUSB v3.0;
  • from now on, GRUB will pause when the ENTER key is used before starting to load Windows. This is useful if you want to see if there are errors in the GRUB loading stage.

Also, since the application name has changed, the executables have changed as well: “woeusbgui” for the GUI and “woeusb” for the command line tool.

You can see what’s new in each new WoeUSB release (there were 13 new releases for the past 2 days) on GitHub.

Despite the major code refactoring and numerous bug fixes, I still encountered an error using the WoeUSB GUI, which I also found in the original WinUSB. When the Windows USB stick is completed, WoeUSB displayed the following message: “Installation failed ! Exit code: 256”. This bug was closed on GitHub and it looks like it doesn’t affect the actual Windows USB stick in any way.

In my test, I was able to install Windows 10 64bit in VirtualBox (on an Ubuntu 17.04 host) despite this error.

Install WoeUSB in Ubuntu or Linux Mint via PPA

WoeUSB is available in the main WebUpd8 PPA, for Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10, 16.04 or 14.04 / Linux Mint 18.x or 17.x. To add the PPA and install WoeUSB, use the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt update
sudo apt install woeusb

If you don’t want to add the PPA, you can grab the latest WoeUSB deb from HERE (you’ll only need the “woeusb” deb; the “winusb” deb is there as a transitional dummy package, so those that had the old fork installed will receive the new WoeUSB package as an update).

For how to build WoeUSB from source, report bugs, etc., see its GitHub page.

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Why Oracle Java 7 And 6 Installers No Longer Work

Oracle Java
Because I’ve received more than 50 emails about this, I though I’d make a post about it, to clear things up for everybody.
While Oracle Java 6 and 7 are not supported for quite a while, they were still available for download on Oracle’s website until recently.

However, the binaries were removed about 10 days ago (?), so the Oracle Java (JDK) 6 and 7 installers available in the WebUpd8 Oracle Java PPA no longer work.

Oracle Java 6 and 7 are now only available for those with an Oracle Support account (which is not free), so I can’t support this for the PPA packages.

From the Oracle Java downloads page:

“Updates for Java SE 7 released after April 2015, and updates for Java SE 6 released after April 2013 are only available to Oracle Customers through My Oracle Support (requires support login).

Java SE Advanced offers users commercial features, access to critical bug fixes, security fixes, and general maintenance”.

It’s highly recommended you update to Oracle Java 8. Check out the following articles for how to install Oracle Java 8 in Ubuntu (or Linux Mint and derivatives) or Debian via PPA.
If you have an Oracle Support account and you really need Oracle JDK 6 or 7, you can get the installers from the WebUpd8 PPA to work by downloading the binaries and placing them in the following folder:
  • /var/cache/oracle-jdk6-installer/ for JDK 6 (you’ll need version 6u45)
  • /var/cache/oracle-jdk7-installer/ for JDK 7 (you’ll need version 7u80 for 32bit and 64bit or 7u60 for arm)

… and then install the oracle-java6-installer or oracle-java7-installer package.

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Tilix (Previously Terminix) 1.5.8 And Guake 0.8.9 Available In PPA

Tilix (previously called Terminix) and Guake terminal emulators have had new releases recently, and are both available in PPA for Ubuntu / Linux Mint.

Tilix 1.5.8

Tilix

Tilix is a GTK3 terminal emulator. The application allows splitting terminals both horizontally and vertically, which can easily be re-arranged using drag and drop.
Other features include a Quake-like mode (the terminal appears at the top of the screen, and can be toggled on or off with a key), saving and loading groupped terminals, synchronized input and more.

Changes in Tilix 1.5.8 include:

  • window state is now saved and restored between sessions (e.g. if a window is maximized when closed, it will be maximized when you launch Tilix again);
  • sessions can be detached using drag and drop. They can also be re-attached to another Tilix window;
  • sessions can now be reordered using drag and drop or by using Ctrl + Pg Up / Ctrl + Pg Dn;
  • if Ctrl + C is assigned to copy shortcut, tilix is smart enough to only copy when text is selected otherwise normal interrupt is passed;
  • added new variable for titles at session scope for active terminal title;
  • added support for GTK active CSS style. This sould enable better styling of terminal titlebars;
  • added support for VTE hyperlink functionality;
  • bug fixes.

It’s also important to mention that with this release, Tilix now uses PCRE2 for regular expressions when the VTE version indicates it is supported. This feature was removed from VTE in Ubuntu 17.10, and as a result, Tilix won’t work properly in this Ubuntu version unless Tilix or VTE is patched.
I’ll look into this in the future. Right now, the WebUpd8 Tilix PPA doesn’t support Ubuntu 17.10.
To install Tilix in Ubuntu 16.04, 16.10 or 17.04 / Linux Mint 18.x, you can use the WebUpd8 Tilix PPA. To add the PPA and install Tilix, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/terminix
sudo apt update
sudo apt install tilix

I didn’t link directly to the Tilix deb because you’ll need some extra dependencies from the PPA.
For how to install Tilix in other Linux distributions, bug reports, etc., see its webpage.

Guake 0.8.9

Guake terminal

Guake is a drop-down terminal emulator. While a GTK3 version is in development (currently in alpha), the stable Guake version is currently using GTK2.
The application slides down from the top of the key when a key is pressed and slides back up when using the same key. This functionality is inspired from consoles using in games such as Quake.
Quake features multi-monitor support, tabs, transparency, and is higly configurable.

Changes in Guake 0.8.9 include:

  • a new option was added which allows running a script when the Guake window becomes visible (this is available on the “Hooks” tab);
  • added an option for toggling ‘resizer’ visibility;
  • tabs now share the full screen width;
  • the ‘Quick open’ feature now also matches /home path;
  • added “-l” command line option to get the tab label;
  • fixed quick open not working with dash;
  • Unity screen size fixes.

Guake 0.8.9 is available in the WebUpd8 Unstable / Backports PPA for Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10, 16.04, and 14.04 / Linux Mint 18.x and 17.x. 
I used this PPA so it’s easy to go back to the Guake version available in the official repositories in case you don’t like the new version or it’s buggy. The packages in this PPA are usually pretty stable, though some unstable packages may be added at times.
To add the PPA and install the latest Guake, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/unstable
sudo apt update
sudo apt install guake

If you don’t want to add the PPA, you can download the Guake deb from HERE (scroll down for the latest version).

To download the Guake source, report bugs, etc., see its GitHub page.

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Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Available For Download

Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

Ubuntu 17.04 has been released.

The new version brings updated applications and various under-the-hood improvements, along with bug fixes. As expected, Compiz and Unity have only received minor improvements and bug fixes.

On the other hand, Ubuntu 17.04 includes the GNOME 3.24 stack for the most part (GTK3 along with Totem, Disks, Calendar, and so on). There are some missing bits, but this is still pretty important, as Ubuntu didn’t use the latest GNOME since around Ubuntu 11.10 / GNOME 3.2.

Unity and Compiz in Ubuntu 17.04

As you probably know, Ubuntu will switch to GNOME (Shell) by default starting with Ubuntu 18.04 (to be released in April, 2018).
However, even before this announcement, Unity 7 was in maintenance mode, with the focus being Unity 8. It did receive some features, like the option to move the launcher to the bottom in Ubuntu 16.04, but only bug fixes for the most part.
Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) is no different. Both Unity and Compiz only had some minor changes and bug fixes, such as:
  • keep the screen locked if autologin or nopasswdlogin is enabled;
  • if scale-factor is not set, find and set right scale for HiDPI displays;
  • dropped click scope from the default list of favourites;
  • fixed lock screen not covering the entire desktop on HiDPI display with draw-user-backgrounds unchecked;
  • fixed issue that made it impossible to exit screensaver if a menu or application grabs the screen;
  • fixed bug preventing switching to the copy / move dialog;
  • fixed bug that caused users to be asked to unlock the screen twice after closing the guest session;
  • Compiz Move plugin: add options for only showing the window shape (outline, rectangle);
  • Compiz: added option to disable blend in grid plugin.

Complete changelogs for Unity and Compiz.

I should also mention that while Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Ubuntu and Canonical, has recently said that Canonical is ending their “investment in Unity8”, Ubuntu 17.04 ships with an experimental Unity 8 session by default, just like Ubuntu 16.10.
Here’s a Unity 8 screenshot I took under Ubuntu 17.04 (by the way, Unity 8 now works in VirtualBox):

Unity 8 Ubuntu 17.04

Defaults and other changes

Ubuntu Software 17.04

Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus ships with GTK 3.24 and GNOME 3.24 applications for the most part.
Not all the bits were updated to version 3.24 though. The exceptions are Nautilus (3.20), Terminal (3.20), Gedit (3.22), Software (3.22) and Evolution (3.22).

Besides the applications mentioned above, Ubuntu 17.04 ships with Firefox 52.0.1, Thunderbird 45.8.0, LibreOffice 5.3.1, Transmission 2.92, Shotwell 0.22+git, Rhythmbox 3.4.1, Totem 3.24.0, GNOME Disks 3.24.0, GNOME Calendar 3.24, GNOME System Monitor 3.24 and Evince 3.24, on top of Unity 7.5.0 (+17.04.20170407) and Compiz 0.9.13.1 (+17.04.20170109).

Under the hood, Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) ships with Xorg server 1.19.3, Mesa 17.0.3, Ubuntu Linux Kernel 4.10.0-19.21 based on the upstream 4.10 Linux Kernel, PulseAudio 10.0, and systemd 232.

Here’s a quick list of changes in the Linux Kernel since the version used in the previous Ubuntu release (Linux 4.8 for Ubuntu 16.10):

  • Linux 4.9 (more information: Kernel Newbies | Phoronix):
    • AMDGPU virtual display support;
    • better AMDGPU GPU reset support;
    • shared data extents and copy-on-write support for XFS;
    • support for new ARM machines, including Raspberry Pi Zero and LG Nexus 5;
  • Linux 4.10 (more information: Kernel Newbies | Phoronix):
    • initial Intel Graphics Virtualization Technology support;
    • improved writeback management;
    • Nouveau Boost support, which allows new graphics cards to go up to their “boost” frequencies, and not just the highest standard frequency;
    • support for Intel Turbo Boost Max 3.0 and Intel Cache Allocation Technology.

Other changes in Ubuntu 17.04:

  • Ubuntu now includes support for printing without printer-specific drivers. Among the supported printers are IPP Everywhere and Apple AirPrint printers, but also some PDF, Postscript, and PCL printers;
  • the default DNS resolver is now systemd-resolved;
  • for new installs, a swap file will be used instead of a swap partition;
  • gconf is no longer installed by default;
  • this release does not include 32bit powerpc.

Download Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus)

Download Ubuntu 17.04 | official release notes
(includes instructions for upgrading from older Ubuntu versions)

Important: all non-LTS Ubuntu versions are only supported for 9 months. Ubuntu 17.04 will be supported until January 2018.
Official release notes and download links for the Ubuntu 17.04 desktop flavors:

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Pandora Radio Client Pithos 1.3.0 Released, Available In PPA

Pithos 1.3.0 was released recently and is now available in its official PPA, for Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10 and 16.04. The new version brings support for MPRIS playlist and tracklist interfaces, improved accessibility UI, and more.
Pithos

Pithos is a Pandora Radio (only available in Australia, New Zealand and the United States) client that supports Pandora features such as love / ban / tired, allows creating, editing and switching between stations, and more.
The application integrates tightly with the desktop, providing notifications, MPRIS v2 support (it integrates with the Ubuntu Sound Menu / GNOME Shell, etc. ), media keys, can inhibit the screensaver and so on.

Pithos 1.3.0 includes a complete MPRIS implementation thanks to the addition of playlist and tracklist MPRIS interfaces.
With the GNOME Shell Media Player Indicator extension, Pithos exposes the current playlist and station list in the indicator (these need to be enabled in the extension settings):

Pithos

Pithos

This feature does not work with the Ubuntu Sound Menu due to an upstream bug.
Another change in Pithos 1.3.0 is the addition of a new plugin that allows controlling the systemd logging level (or completely disabling it) for Pithos. The logs since last reboot can be printed by running Pithos with the “–last-logs” command line argument.

Other changes in Pithos 1.3.0 include:

  • added dynamic rating and cover icons based upon theme colors;
  • added symbolic icon;
  • added man page;
  • improved handling playlist expiration;
  • improved search in stations list;
  • improved UI accessibility;
  • improved libsecret support;
  • removed libnotify dependency in favor of a custom notification implementation (the reason for this is that libnotify does blocking I/O);
  • fixed disabling keybindings plugin when using keybinder;
  • fixed notification icon trying to load on Wayland;
  • fixed failure to reconnect on login expiration;
  • fixed some plugins not being enabled by default;
  • fixed handling error on MPRIS plugin failure.

Also, compared to the Pithos version available in the official Ubuntu / Linux Mint repositories (1.1.2 for Ubuntu 17.04 and 1.1.1 for Ubuntu 16.04 / Linux Mint 18), the application has received quite a few improvements, including a keyboard shortcuts window, more quality options, the password is now stored with libsecret, along with bug fixes. 
The UI was also updated to use header bars and the stations dropdown now uses a popover.
Pithos currently has only 2 contributors and it could use more devs. If you can help, see its GitHub page.

Install Pithos in Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10 or 16.04 / Linux Mint 18.x

An older Pithos version is available in the official Ubuntu repositories. To install it, simply use the following command:
sudo apt install pithos

Ubuntu 16.04, 16.10 or 17.04 / Linux Mint 18 users can install the latest Pithos by using its official PPA. To add the PPA and install Pithos, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:pithos/ppa
sudo apt update
sudo apt install pithos
If you don’t want to add the PPA, you can grab the deb from HERE.
For installing Pithos in other Linux distributions (including Flatpak), see the install section on its homepage.
Report any bugs you may want @ GitHub.

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How Linux Figures Reacted to Ubuntu’s Unity Bombshell

reaction roundupNews that Ubuntu is to u-turn on Unity, can Convergence, and scrap its smartphones took the open-source community by total surprise last week. In this post we roundup the reactions that some prominent free software stalwarts, Linux pundits, and former Canonical employees had to the news. This list is by no means exhaustive. If you’ve spotted a tweet, blog post or other rant from […]

This post, How Linux Figures Reacted to Ubuntu’s Unity Bombshell, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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New KDE Connect Indicator Ubuntu / Linux Mint PPA

The KDE Connect Indicator (fork) PPA maintainer is not available any more, and I was asked to create a new PPA. 

KDE Connect Indicator

Since I’m a KDE Connect Indicator user myself, I couldn’t say no, so I created a new KDE Connect Indicator PPA, which provides packages for Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10 and 16.04 / Linux Mint 18.x.

I didn’t upload packages for Ubuntu 14.04 / Linux Mint 17.x because I couldn’t build the latest KDE Connect for this Ubuntu version due to newer dependencies, and Ubuntu 14.04 has a pretty old KDE Connect version.
The KDE Connect Indicator (fork) developer is also looking for someone that can create and maintain Flatpack and Snap packages. If you can help, see THIS bug report.
In case you’re not familiar with KDE Connect Indicator, this is an indicator / tray for KDE Connect. Using KDE Connect, you can mirror Android notifications on the desktop, easily send and receive files from an Android device to your desktop (and the other way around), control desktop media players from Android, share the clipboard between your Android device and desktop, and more.
Check out our KDE Connect Indicator fork article for more information.

Install KDE Connect Indicator fork in Ubuntu or Linux Mint via new PPA

As a reminder, KDE Connect depends on quite a few KDE packages. You may want to save the KDE package list that’s installed to make it easier to remove in the future, in case you want to remove them (“apt autoremove” won’t remove all of them, at least in Ubuntu).
To add the new KDE Connect Indicator fork PPA and install the app in Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10 or 16.04 / Linux Mint 18.x, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/indicator-kdeconnect
sudo apt update
sudo apt install indicator-kdeconnect

You can also download the latest KDE Connect Indicator deb from GitHub, but you won’t receive updates through your system’s update manager. For Ubuntu 16.04 and 16.10 / Linux Mint 18, you’ll also need a newer KDE Connect version for the indicator to work. KDE Connect 1.0.3 is available for Ubuntu 16.04 / Linux Mint 18 and Ubuntu 16.10 in the PPA.

If you encounter bugs, report them @ GitHub.

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Polo Is An Interesting New GTK3 File Manager (Beta)

Developed by Tony George, who’s also behind other fairly popular applications such as Selene Media Converter, TimeShift backup tool, and more, Polo is only available for users who donate for now. The stable release will be available for all users, however, those who donate will get a few extra features.

 

Polo File Manager

 

Polo is a new file manager that aims at providing features that are missing from popular file managers. The application is currently in beta, and it lacks some feature, but it already looks very promising.

For example, the developer wants to include built-in support for multiple cloud storage services like Dropbox, Google Drive and others, using rclone as a backend.

 

Another feature that’s missing in many graphical file managers is being able to browse archives as if they were folders. This is another feature that Polo should get before its first stable release. There should also be a built-in GUI for creating archives, similar to the one used by 7zip in Windows.
These two features are currently not available in Polo.
The current Polo beta 3 already includes quite a few interesting features though. The file manager supports tabs, along with multiple panes. You can use 2 panes, either vertical or horizontal, and even 4 panes:

 

Polo File Manager

 

There are context menu items to easily copy files or folders from one pane to another, as well as a middle toolbar that provides these, along with other options.
Another cool feature available in the Polo Beta 3 version I tested is session support. Polo remembers the last session and it reloads it the next time it runs. It restores not only open tabs and the pane layout, but also open directories.
The Polo toolbar and pathbar are highly configurable, allowing you to enable or disable various buttons:

 

Polo File Manager

 

You can also configure the toolbar to display large icons, show only labels, labels beside icons, and use a dark background.

 

Polo File Manager
Polo file properties – audio info

 

Polo File Manager
Polo bookmarks

Other Polo features worth mentioning:

  • multiple views: list, icons, tiles and media;
  • easily open folders as root (with pkexec support);
  • extended details when replacing existing files;
  • statusbar that displays the number of files, folders (including hidden), along with available disk space and a disk space indicator, and the filesystem type;
  • bookmarks support (web browser-like: a star is displayed at the right of the pathbar);
  • media view: when Polo detects you’re browsing a folder containing photos or videos, it switches to a 256×256 size icon view to make it easier to browse through items;
  • media info in the file properties dialog, which displays EXIF tags (such as exposure, iso, camera model and much more) and audio info (artist, album, track name, along with audio format, bit rate, etc.), PDF metadata, etc.
  • tabs can be renamed;
  • keyboard shortcuts;
  • toolbar button and context menu to open current folder in a terminal.

 

Work in progress

 

Besides built-in cloud service and archive support, the developer also wants to add support for Nemo extensions in the future.
The audio preview feature that was available in Nautilus 2, which allowed hovering over audio files to preview them, might be implemented as well.
One feature that won’t be implemented is desktop handling (drawing the wallpaper / desktop icons).
I should also mention that in its current state, Polo is not suitable for daily use.

While in my test, I only encountered two major bugs (very slow copying folders with a large number of files and the app crashes when entering a folder with a large number of images), there are a few major features that are missing, like support for drag’n’drop and trash, along with many missing bits and pieces (like type-ahead). And, of course, there are some bugs as well. But that’s to be expected since Polo is beta software.

The next beta version is expected to be released on April 15 (initially it was April 8, but it was delayed).

 

Getting Polo file manager

 

Like I mentioned in the beginning of the article, Polo is currently only available for users who donate. The stable version will be available for all, with some extra features for donors.
Check out the Polo tag on Tony George’s website for how to donate, along with more information about Polo, including completed and pending feature status.

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Ubuntu 18.04 LTS To Use GNOME By Default; Unity 8 And The Phone To Be Discontinued

Ubuntu logo

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will go back to using GNOME as the default desktop environment, instead of Unity.

In what comes as a big surprise for many, Mark Shuttleworh, the founder of Ubuntu and Canonical, explains on the Ubuntu Insights website that Canonical is ending their “investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell”.
Existing LTS releases will continue to be maintained, so Unity 7 should still see some bug fixes in the future. However, with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (to be released in April, 2018), the default desktop environment will be GNOME.

While Mark doesn’t explicitly says “GNOME Shell”, I assume that’s what he means, especially since Unity 7 has been in maintenance mode for quite a few Ubuntu releases.

 

“I took the view that, if convergence was the future and we could deliver it as free software, that would be widely appreciated both in the free software community and in the technology industry, where there is substantial frustration with the existing, closed, alternatives available to manufacturers. I was wrong on both counts.
In the community, our efforts were seen fragmentation not innovation. And industry has not rallied to the possibility, instead taking a ‘better the devil you know’ approach to those form factors, or investing in home-grown platforms. What the Unity8 team has delivered so far is beautiful, usable and solid, but I respect that markets, and community, ultimately decide which products grow and which disappear”.

– Mark Shuttleworth

Check out the complete article HERE.

What do you think?

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Razer Peripherals Configuration GUI Polychromatic 0.3.8 Released With Overhauled Tray / AppIndicator

Polychromatic, an unofficial GUI and tray applet for configuring Razer peripherals on Linux, was updated to version 0.3.8 today, bringing a completely overhauled tray / AppIndicator applet which only shows options relevant to your device(s), along with other changes.

Polychromatic Razer configuration tool

Polychromatic uses Razer Drivers (unofficial) under the hood, which supports quite a few Razer peripherals, including:
  • keyboards: BlackWidow Chroma and Chroma v2, BlackWidow Ultimate 2013 and 2016, BlackWidow Classic, BlackWidow X Ultimate, Ornata, DeathStalker Chroma;
  • mice and mousemats: DeathAdder Chroma, DeathAdder Elite, Firefly, Mamba, Mamba Tournament Edition, Naga Hex and Hex v2, Razer Ouroboros 2012;
  • other devices: Blade Pro, Blade Stealth, Kraken 7.1 Chroma and v2, Razer Core.

For a complete list of supported Razer peripherals, check out THIS page.
Using Polychromatic, you can change effects, brightness and color modes, and create application profiles, though this doesn’t seem to be supported for mice – or at least I don’t have this option for my Razer Ouroboros mouse.
From the Polychromatic tray applet, you can quickly set effects, brightness and modes, change application profiles and DPI on the fly, and more.

Polychromatic tray applet running in Linux Mint 18.1 (Cinnamon)

Changes in Polychromatic 0.3.8 include:

  • overhauled tray applet / AppIndicator:
    • only show options relevant to the selected device;
    • you can now use it to change the mouse DPI;
    • mproved support for devices that have separate logo/scroll lighting options;
    • displays the current status for effects, brightness, DPI and color;
    • displays saved colors and allows switching between them;
    • a new option was added which allows restarting the Razer Drivers daemon;
  • controller:
    • improved selection for changing icons;
    • macros, game modes and profiles only show if the device supports them;
    • ultimate (non-RGB) keyboards present shades of green;
    • UI improvements and various under the hood fixes.

Two features were temporarily dropped with Polychromatic 0.3.8. Startup Settings is no longer available because it was unreliable, though this should come back with the next major release. The second feature that was temporarily dropped is the daemon options, because the latest daemon version doesn’t read them.
Furthermore, with this release, there are Polychromatic packages available for Fedora and openSUSE.
Note that the new option to change the mouse DPI from the tray applet doesn’t seem to have an option to configure the DPI values. For my Razer Ouroboros mouse, it lists 5 scan resolutions, which I suspect are what the mouse provides by default.
Also, in my test under Ubuntu 17.04, when changing the DPI from the Polychromatic tray applet, the current DPI value it displays is “0” instead of the actual value. This didn’t occur in my test under Linux Mint 18.1 though.
For an alternative to Polychromatic for mice only, that doesn’t use Razer Drivers under the hood (useful if Razer Drivers doesn’t support your device or if you’re having issues with it), you may want to take a look at RazerCfg.

Install Polychromatic (and Razer Drivers) in Ubuntu or Linux Mint

Before installing Polychromatic, you’ll need to install Razer Drivers from its official PPA. Note that to be able to install Razer Drivers, you’ll need to make sure the “universe” repository is enabled (via Software & Updates)!
To add the PPA and install Razer Drivers in Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10 or 16.04 / Linux Mint 18, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:terrz/razerutils
sudo apt update
sudo apt install python3-razer razer-kernel-modules-dkms razer-daemon razer-doc
sudo modprobe razerkbd

Note: the Razer Drivers PPA provides packages for Ubuntu 14.04 / Linux Mint 17, but Polychromatic doesn’t work with this Ubuntu version because it depends on webkit2gtk, which is not available for Ubuntu 14.04.

Now you can install Polychromatic, by using its official PPA. To add the PPA and install it in Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10 or 14.04 / Linux Mint 18, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:lah7/polychromatic
sudo apt update
sudo apt install polychromatic

If you don’t want to add the Polychromatic PPA, you can download the deb from its GitHub releases page.

The Polychromatic Tray Applet and Controller are available as separate items in the menu / Unity Dash, so you’ll have to launch them separately.

If your Razer device is listed in the supported peripherals list but is not detected by Polychromatic, try restarting the daemon, either from Polychromatic Controller (on the Daemon tab > Daemon Service > Restart) or the tray (Advanced > Restart Daemon) and / or try restarting your computer.
For installing Razer Drivers and Polychromatic in other Linux distributions, see the following pages:

Report any bugs you may find on GitHub: Polychromatic | Razer Drivers.

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