Tag Archives: unity

Nemo 3.4 Without Cinnamon Dependencies Available In PPA For Ubuntu 17.04 And 16.04

Nemo 3.4 (3.4.7 at the time I’m writing this article) without Cinnamon dependencies and with Unity patches is now available in the WebUpd8 Nemo 3 PPA, for Ubuntu 17.04 and 16.04.
While it comes with some Unity patches, this Nemo version should work with other desktop environments as well, like GNOME (Shell), etc.

Nemo 3.4 file manager

Nemo was forked from the old Nautilus 3.4 (before it lost quite a few features) and is the default file manager of the Cinnamon desktop environment. It includes features that are no longer available in Nautilus, such as dual panes, configurable toolbar and much, much more.

Among the changes in Nemo 3.4 are:

  • separate processes for Nemo and the desktop handling;
  • a new desktop icon mode is available: desktop grid. This new mode allows changing the icon size (smaller, normal, larger) as well as the icon orientation (horizontal or vertical), sort by name, date, type or size, auto-arrange or manual layout, and align to grid;
  • simpler date formats for the last modified column in list view;
  • wildcard support in file searches;
  • Firefox-like support for middle-click and Ctrl key in Nemo navigation buttons to open new tabs;
  • you can now change the desktop font (font face and size). To do this, use Dconf Editor (under org > nemo > desktop > font);
  • other improvements and bug fixes.

Nemo 3.4 file manager

Note that the new desktop grid mode is set as default. If you want to use the old desktop layout, use Dconf Editor to enable it (go to org > nemo > desktop > use-desktop-grid and set it to false).
You can configure the spacing for the new desktop grid layout. You can do this using Dconf Editor, under org > nemo > desktop > horizontal-grid-adjust (or vertical-grid-adjust).
I also have to mention that if you set the layout to horizontal while using the new desktop grid, this will also affect the old desktop layout if you go back to it. I’m not sure if this is intended or it’s a bug. Also, while using the old desktop layout with a horizontal icon orientation, there’s a bug – when moving a file when moving a file or folder from one desktop to another, the file/folder continues to show up on the original desktop until that desktop is refreshed (e.g. using Ctrl + r).

Install Nemo 3.4 without Cinnamon dependencies and with Unity patches in Ubuntu 17.04 or 16.04


For how to install the latest Nemo 3.4 in Ubuntu 17.04 and 16.04 (and derivatives), see THIS article (it was initially posted for Nemo 3.2, but the PPA now provides Nemo 3.4).

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A Small Unity Feature Missing in GNOME Shell [Video]

Ubuntu mouse by Shannon BlackA world of change is headed to Ubuntu as the distro switches from Unity to GNOME Shell. Long time Unity users accustomed to the workflow, feature set and quirks of Ubuntu’s incumbent releases will need to adapt to different ways of doing familiar things in its upcoming ones. Thankfully there’s no major interaction gulf between […]

This post, A Small Unity Feature Missing in GNOME Shell [Video], was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Alpha 2 Released, Includes HUD, Global Menu

Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Alpha 2 is now available to download and if you’re a big fan of the Unity desktop you’re going to love what’s on offer. The screenshot above shows some of the major improvements Ubuntu MATE 17.10 has made to its ‘Unity’ style layout (called ‘Mutiny’, and accessible through the MATE Tweaks app). Forget the […]

This post, Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Alpha 2 Released, Includes HUD, Global Menu, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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Ambient Noise (ANoise) Player Fixed For Ubuntu 16.04 And Newer

Ambient Noise, or ANoise is a simple, lightweight application for playing ambient noises, such as waves, rain, fire, and so on, useful to help you stay focused and boost productivity, or fall asleep.
The application didn’t work in Ubuntu 16.04 and newer until recently, when it was updated to GStreamer 1.0 and Python 3, along with some bug fixes.

Ambient Noise Ubuntu

ANoise runs directly in the Ubuntu Sound Menu, without a GUI. From there you can easily play various relaxing sounds such as rain, wind, forest, storm, fire, night, coffee shop, or sea.

Besides the Ubuntu Sound Menu, ANoise also supports the Media Player Indicator extension for GNOME Shell, as well as the Linux Mint (Cinnamon) Sound applet. Although for Linux Mint, note that the ambient noise icon is larger than it should be.
Here’s ANoise running in GNOME Shell (with Media Player Indicator extension):

Ambient Noise GNOME Shell

ANoise can also be used on desktop environments without Ubuntu Sound Menu / Media Player Indicator. In such cases, you can install the ANoise GUI:

Ambient Noise GUI

Other ANoise features include:

  • default sounds: rain, wind, storm, fire, forest, night, coffee shop and sea;
  • it remembers your last played ambient noise between reboots;
  • includes a sleep timer as well as an option to start automatically on system startup;
  • unlike some websites that offer the same functionality, ANoise works without an Internet connection;
  • supports custom sounds. You can copy extra ambient noises (ogg, mp3 or wav) into the ~/ANoise or ~/.ANoise folder and the application should be able to use them (you can also add a .png with the same name as the audio file to be used in the Ubuntu Sound Menu);
  • extra ambient noise packs are available in its PPA.

Note: if the ANoise GUI package is not installed, to open the ANoise preferences you’ll need to click on the ANoise entry in the Ubuntu Sound Menu.

Install ANoise in Ubuntu or Linux Mint

To add the Ambient Noise PPA and install the application in Ubuntu or Linux Mint, use the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:costales/anoise
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install anoise gir1.2-webkit-3.0

Note that the default ANoise sounds package is about 100 MiB in size!

Once installed, simply launch “Ambient Noise” from Dash / the menu, and control it from the Ubuntu Sound Menu / Media Player Indicator Extension / Cinnamon Sound applet.
For other desktop environments, you can install the ANoise GUI using the following command:
sudo apt install anoise-gui

For extra sounds, you install the ANoise community extensions, by using the following command:
sudo apt install anoise-community-extension1 anoise-community-extension2 anoise-community-extension3 anoise-community-extension4

Here’s what they contain:

  • anoise-community-extension1: river sound;
  • anoise-community-extension2: old air conditioner, large boat, house fan, fountain, forest rain, fishing boat, dump truck idling and diesel motor sounds;
  • anoise-community-extension3: white, pink, brown OSSL and brown noises;
  • anoise-community-extension4: pinery wind, old dam waterfall, thunderstorm, stoney creek, rideau river, lake superior, lake huron, frogs, dinosaur drain and coon creek sounds.

For more about Ambient Noise, see its web page.

via Marcos Costales @ G+

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Latest Ubuntu 17.10 Update Ditches the Unity Desktop, Installs GNOME

ubuntu 17.10And so it begins: the Unity desktop and related packages have been removed from the ‘seeds’ used to build Ubuntu 17.10. As previously announced, Ubuntu 17.10 will ship with GNOME Shell as the default desktop environment in place of Canonical’s home-grown Unity desktop. Unity has been Ubuntu’s default desktop since 2011. Currently in proposed-updates to the Artful Aardvark, the latest […]

This post, Latest Ubuntu 17.10 Update Ditches the Unity Desktop, Installs GNOME, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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Unity 7 To Get an Easy Way to Enable Low Graphics Mode

A more accessible way to enable low graphics mode on Unity 7 may be on the way. The desktop already supports a low graphics mode of sorts, which can be enabled via Compiz. But this is far a) not easy to enable and b) does not disable every cycle-sucking composited element in the UI. But a fix is coming. Unity 7 will […]

This post, Unity 7 To Get an Easy Way to Enable Low Graphics Mode, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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