Tag Archives: Windows

Two Popular Open-Source Apps Are Now Available in the Windows Store

windows store logoTwo of the most celebrated open-source applications are now available on the Windows Store, though one comes with a £7.49/$9.79 price tag attached.

This post, Two Popular Open-Source Apps Are Now Available in the Windows Store, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Read More

Tool To Create Bootable Windows USB Stick From Linux `WinUSB` (Fork) Renamed To `WoeUSB`, Sees New Release

The WinUSB fork we covered a while back was renamed to WoeUSB recently, while also seeing quite a few releases for the past few days.

WoeUSB

WoeUSB / WinUSB is a tool that can be used to create a bootable Windows installer USB stick from an ISO or DVD. The application supports Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, as well Windows 10, and can be used either with a GUI or from the command line.

As for supported bootmodes, WoeUSB / WinUSB can create a bootable Windows USB installation stick using the following:
  • Legacy / MBR-style / IBM PC compatible bootmode;
  • Native UEFI booting is supported for Windows 7 and later images (with a limitation: only FAT filesystem can be used as the target filesystem).

Since it was forked from Colin Gille’s WinUSB, the application has seen a major code refactoring, bug fixes as well as some minor new features. The changes include:
  • support for both wxWidgets 2 and 3;
  • use pkexec instead of gksudo for privilege escalation;
  • UEFI boot support;
  • numerous bug fixes.

Some newer WoeUSB changes include:

  • support customizing the –label of the newly created filesystem in –format mode;
  • implement checking on target filesystem in –install mode;
  • command line: check if target media is busy before continuing and bail out when the target partition is mounted;
  • support Linux distributions that uses “grub2” as prefix name, such as Fedora;
  • –install and –format installation options are deprecated in favor of –partition and –device, to be more clear what both options will do. The old options will still be available until WoeUSB v3.0;
  • from now on, GRUB will pause when the ENTER key is used before starting to load Windows. This is useful if you want to see if there are errors in the GRUB loading stage.

Also, since the application name has changed, the executables have changed as well: “woeusbgui” for the GUI and “woeusb” for the command line tool.

You can see what’s new in each new WoeUSB release (there were 13 new releases for the past 2 days) on GitHub.

Despite the major code refactoring and numerous bug fixes, I still encountered an error using the WoeUSB GUI, which I also found in the original WinUSB. When the Windows USB stick is completed, WoeUSB displayed the following message: “Installation failed ! Exit code: 256”. This bug was closed on GitHub and it looks like it doesn’t affect the actual Windows USB stick in any way.

In my test, I was able to install Windows 10 64bit in VirtualBox (on an Ubuntu 17.04 host) despite this error.

Install WoeUSB in Ubuntu or Linux Mint via PPA

WoeUSB is available in the main WebUpd8 PPA, for Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10, 16.04 or 14.04 / Linux Mint 18.x or 17.x. To add the PPA and install WoeUSB, use the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt update
sudo apt install woeusb

If you don’t want to add the PPA, you can grab the latest WoeUSB deb from HERE (you’ll only need the “woeusb” deb; the “winusb” deb is there as a transitional dummy package, so those that had the old fork installed will receive the new WoeUSB package as an update).

For how to build WoeUSB from source, report bugs, etc., see its GitHub page.

Read More

Streamlink 0.5.0 Adds Support For Streaming Google Drive / Google Docs Videos

Streamlink 0.5.0 was released yesterday, bringing support for streaming videos from Google Drive / Google Docs, along with other improvements.

Streamlink

Forked from Livestreamer, which is no longer maintained, Streamlink is a command line tool (and API) that can be used to stream videos from various streaming services, such as Twitch, YouTube Live and many more, and play them using your favorite video player, be it VLC, mpv, and more.

It is is available for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS.

Changes in Streamlink 0.5.0 include:

  • added support for streaming videos stored on Google Drive / Google Docs;
  • added support for BBC iPlayer live and VOD, along with support for HLS streams;
  • add support for Beam VOD and HLS streams for live;
  • added support for camsoda.com;
  • added new plugin: canlitv;
  • added new plugin: garena;
  • Aliez plugin now accepts any TLD;
  • added support for avi/mov VOD streams for rtve;
  • removed dead plugins such as blip.tv, gaminglive.tv, leon.tv, livestation.com and more.

Since our initial article about Streamlink, the tool has seen quite a few improvements, including support to use FFmpeg to mux separate video and audio streams, along with new plugins and much more. Check out the Streamlink GitHub releases page for a complete changelog.

For a complete list of supported streaming services, see THIS page.

Using the Streamlink command line interface is very simple. Here’s an example using a Google Drive video. The first thing you need to do is run Streamlink with the link you want to stream, to see the available streams:

streamlink https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0tRrdcY7CwJWGdVdHEyYWpfTTQ

This should list the available formats:

[cli][info] Found matching plugin googledrive for URL https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0tRrdcY7CwJWGdVdHEyYWpfTTQ
Available streams: 360p_alt, 480p_alt, 360p (worst), 480p, 720p, 1080p (best)

Next, simply add one of the available streams at the end of the command, and Streamlink will start streaming:

streamlink https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0tRrdcY7CwJWGdVdHEyYWpfTTQ 1080p

By default, Streamlink uses VLC to play the stream, but you can specify a different video player by using the “–player” argument, e.g. “–player mpv” to use mpv instead.

For more about using the Streamlink command line interface, check out THIS page.

Install Streamlink

Ubuntu / Linux Mint users can install Streamlink by using the main WebUpd8 PPA. To add the PPA and install Streamlink, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt update
sudo apt install streamlink

I didn’t add a direct deb download link because the PPA provides quite a few dependencies required to install Streamlink.
For how to install Streamlink in other Linux distributions, Windows or Mac OS, see THIS page.
Report any bugs you may find @ GitHub.

Read More

Code Editor `Brackets` 1.9 Released, Available In PPA

Brackets is a free, open source code editor focused on front-end web development (HTML, CSS and JavaScript).

The application, which was originally developed by Adobe, is available for Linux, Windows and MacOS.

Brackets editor Linux

Since I haven’t written about Brackets in a while, here’s a quick list of its main features:
  • live preview: see your changes in real time in a web browser (by default, this only supports Google Chrome, but there’s also experimental support for other browsers – you can enable it from the Brackets File menu);
  • inline editor: simply put your mouse cursor on a CSS ID, press Ctrl + E and Brackets displays the CSS selectors inline;
  • supports extensions and comes with a built-in extension manager, with hundreds of themes and extensions available to install.

Brackets extension manager

Changes in Brackets 1.9 include:

  • reverse inspect in Live Preview (clicking an element in Live Preview highlights the corresponding tag in the source code);
  • the application now supports “Replace All” in Find & Replace along with batch operation;
  • the Extension Manager now displays the download count for listed extension, and it allows sorting based on download count or published date. Thanks to this, you can easily find the most popular and the latest extensions;
  • focus can now be swapped between panes using a keyboard shortcut (Alt + w);
  • language mode can now be changed for untitled documents (and code coloringand code hints are now supported for such documents);
  • GitHub organizations can now own Brackets extensions and update them.

A complete changelog is available HERE.

Important! There are two issues with Brackets on Linux.
The first is that to close the application, you must click the close button twice.

And the second issue is that the official Brackets Debian / Ubuntu debs depend on libgcrypt11, which is not available in Ubuntu versions newer than 14.10.

This last issue is fixed if you install libgcrypt11 from an older Ubuntu version, if you upgraded from Ubuntu versions older than 15.04 (so libgcrypt11 is still installed on your system), or if use the WebUpd8 Brackets PPA (there are also direct PPA deb download links below), which should work in any Debian-based Linux distribution, including Ubuntu, Linux Mint and so on.
For more about Brackets, check out its website and wiki.

Download Brackets

(32bit and 64bit debs – only work with Ubuntu 14.10 or older unless you install libgcrypt11 manually or use the PPA -, MacOS and Windows binaries)

To install the latest Brackets in Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10, 16.04 or 14.04 / Linux Mint 18.x or 17.x / Debian 8+ (see how to add a PPA in Debian HERE) by using the WebUpd8 Brackets PPA, run the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/brackets
sudo apt update
sudo apt install brackets

Alternatively, download the WebUpd8 Brackets PPA debs from HERE.

Fedora users can install Brackets by using an unofficial copr repository (not yet updated to version 1.9 at the time I’m posting this article).

Arch Linux users can install Brackets from AUR (not yet updated to version 1.9 at the time I’m posting this article).

Read More

Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0 Adds Support For Communities And Team Pages, Basic Hotkeys

Streamlink Twitch GUI (previously Livestreamer Twitch GUI) is a multi-platform Twitch.tv browser.

The application is powered by Node.js, Chromium and Streamlink, though it can still use Livestreamer (which is no longer maintained) too.

Streamlink Twitch GUI
Using it, you can easily browse Twitch.tv and open streams in your favorite video player, like VLC, Totem, mpv and others.

Streamlink Twitch GUI features:

  • supports both Streamlink as well as the deprecated Livestreamer;
  • watch streams in the video player of your choice;
  • watch multiple streams at once;
  • integrated Twitch.tv login (OAuth) with access to subscriptions and followed channels and games;
  • follow your favorite channels and games;
  • filter streams by channel or broadcaster language;
  • displays desktop notifications whenever a followed channel starts broadcasting;
  • join the Twitch chat using different chat applications;
  • customizable settings for streams (like default quality and buffer), video player parameters, GUI and more;
  • individual channel settings;
  • tray / appindicator which allows pausing the notifications;
  • light and dark themes.

Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0

Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0 was released recently, upgrading to Twitch API v5. Thanks to this, the application has received support for browsing communities and accessing team pages.

Another fairly important change in this release is the addition of basic hotkeys:
  • 0: go to homepage
  • 1-8: visit various main menu routes (9 reserved for future VODs menu)
  • F1: about
  • F10: watching
  • F11: login/logout
  • F12: settings
  • Slash: focus search bar
  • Esc/Backspace: close modal dialog (or cancel action)
  • Enter: confirm modal dialog and close it
  • C: open chat (stream popup or channel page)
  • F: follow / unfollow channel
  • E: open Twitch emotes website (stream popup or channel page)
  • U: copy channel URL (stream popup or channel page)
  • S: subscribe channel (stream popup or channel page)
  • Q/X: Close stream (stream popup)
  • L: Toggle Streamlink/Livestreamer log (stream popup)

Other changes in Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0 include displaying a confirmation when unfollowing a channel or game, restructured main menu as well as channel pages and followed games menu, along with various bug fixes.
A complete changelog is available on GitHub.

Note that Streamlink Twitch GUI uses VLC to play Twitch streams by default. if VLC is not installed or you want to use a different player, go to the app Settings > Player > Video player, then enter the executable for a different video player (e.g.: “mpv” – without the quotes).

Download Streamlink Twitch GUI

Download Streamlink Twitch GUI (binaries available for Linux: 32bit and 64bit generic binaries, Windows: 32bit and 64bit and macOS 32bit)

For how to install Streamlink Twitch GUI, see THIS page.

Note that to be able to use Streamlink Twitch GUI, you’ll need Streamlink or Livestreamer. However, Livestreamer is no longer maintained and you may encounter issues, so Streamlink is recommended!
To install Streamlink Twitch GUI in Ubuntu, Linux Mint and derivates, use the following instructions.

1. Install the required dependencies

Install Streamlink from the main WebUpd8 PPA (recommended)

Alternatively, you can also install Livestreamer:

sudo apt install livestreamer

If you want to use Livestreamer instead of Streamlink you’ll need to open the Streamlink Twitch GUI settings, and on the Streamlink tab, select Livestreamer.

You’ll also need x11-utils and xdg-utils. Install these packages in Ubuntu / Linux Mint using the following commands:
sudo apt install x11-utils xdg-utils

2. Download and install Streamlink Twitch GUI

Download the latest Streamlink Twitch GUI binary from GitHub, place it in your home folder and extract it. Then, you can use the command below to move it to /opt:
cd && sudo mv streamlink-twitch-gui /opt/

3. Create a menu entry for Streamlink Twitch GUI

To create a menu entry, simply run the menu entry creation script that comes with Streamlink Twitch GUI:
/opt/streamlink-twitch-gui/add-menuitem.sh
If after running the command above you can’t find Streamlink Twitch GUI in the menu / Unity Dash or the icon is missing, restart the session (logout / login).

Read More

Rclone 1.36 Released With SFTP And Local Symlinks Support, More

cloud storage

Rclone 1.36 was released recently, bringing support for SFTP, local symbolic links support, mount improvements, along with many other new features and bug fixes.
For those not familiar with Rclone, this is a cross-platform command line tool for synchronizing files and folders to multiple cloud storages, which supports Dropbox, Google Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Microsoft One Drive, Yandex Disk, and more.

It can be used to sync files either from your machine or from one cloud storage to another.
As a reminder, Rclone doesn’t provide real-time file monitoring, and the synchronization is performed on demand (so you must run it manually or using a script, etc.)

For more about Rclone, check out our initial article.

Important changes in Rclone 1.36 include:

  • SFTP remote;
  • re-implement sync routine to work a directory at a time reducing memory usage;
  • logging revamped to be more inline with rsync;
  • implement –backup-dir and –suffix;
  • implement –track-renames;
  • add time-based bandwidth limits;
  • rclone cryptcheck: checks integrity of crypt remotes;
  • allow all config file variables and options to be set from environment variables;
  • add –buffer-size parameter to control buffer size for copy;
  • comply with XDG Base Directory specification (this moves the default location of the config file in a backwards compatible way);
  • MIPS/Linux big and little endian support;
  • local:
    • implement -L, –copy-links flag to allow rclone to follow symlinks;
    • open files in write only mode so rclone can write to an rclone mount;
  • mount:
    • implement proper directory handling (mkdir, rmdir, renaming);
    • make include and exclude filters apply to mount;
    • implement read and write async buffers – control with –buffer-size;
  • crypt:
    • add –crypt-show-mapping to show encrypted file mapping;
    • fix crypt writer getting stuck in a loop (this bug had the potential to cause data corruption when reading data from a network based remote and writing to a crypt on Google Drive).

For a complete changelog, see THIS page.

To use Rclone with a graphical user interface, you may want to check out RcloneBrowser (WebUpd8 provides an Ubuntu PPA for RcloneBrowser so you can easily installing updates).

Download Rclone

(binaries available for Linux: 32bit, 64bit, arm, arm64 and mips big and little endian, Windows :32bit and 64bit, MacOS: 32bit and 64bit, FreeBSD: 32bit, 64bit and arm, and more)

In Linux distributions that support snap packages (Ubuntu and many others), you can install rclone using the following command:

sudo snap install rclone --classic

If you already had Rclone installed using a snap, it should already be up to date (this depends on the snapd version you’re using). Alternatively, you can update it using the following command:

sudo snap refresh rclone --classic

For how to use Rclone, you may want to check out its documentation.

Important: if you use the Rclone snap package, you won’t be able to mount any cloud storage (bug report). When attempting to mount Google Drive, Dropbox, etc., you’ll get an error similar to the following:
Fatal error: failed to mount FUSE fs: fusermount: exec: "fusermount": executable file not found in $PATH
The solution, at least for now, use the Rclone binary downloaded from its website.

To download the source, report bugs, etc., see the Rclone GitHub page.

Read More